Save Bees

How to help revive a cold or wet bee

Bumble beeI’m often asked by folks what to do when one finds a cold, wet, or sluggish bee. The good news is that in many cases, you can help! And depending on the bee, you may not just be helping one bee but many, because your bee may be a queen bee.

If after reading all of the tips and advice below, you still have questions about your particular bee situation, drop your question on this page and I’ll try to get back to you as soon as I possibly can!

Spring and fall are often unpredictable weather and flower-wise, and sometimes you’ll find a bee who’s simply run out of steam and needs a helping hand. Unseasonable weather and a lack of flowers may trip them up, especially at these times of year. A foraging bumble bee is only ever about 40 minutes from starvation.

Late fall bumble bee queens

In late fall, large young bumble bee queens are seeking the last good flowers, stocking up their energy and fat reserves in preparation for hibernation. They're also searching for nice spots in the ground, in which they'll overwinter. They often dig their own small burrows in which to hibernate (behavior you'll sometimes see if you're in the right place at the right time!)

Sometimes they'll appreciate a little help, especially if they're nearly out of energy. Since they're relatively large bees, they need more energy simply to get off the ground. Try offering sugar water, moving them somewhere warmer (into direct sunlight, ideally), or even warming them up a bit gently with your breath.

Late fall male bumble bees

In late fall, you'll sometimes find congregations of small fluffy bumble bees spending the nights on late-season flowers (it's a great time to photograph them, as they can't move about much until they warm up!)

There's no need to worry about these bumble bees. They'll all "buzz up" again as soon as the day warms (and they're totally willing to spend several days out on the flowers, even in the rain if need bee). Once they warm up, they have breakfast right at hand, nectar within the flowers to which they've been clinging. And it's worth their wait, as warm days bring young bumble bee queens to the flowers on which they've been sleeping!

Early spring bumble bee queens

In early spring, large fluffy bumble bee queens are emerging from their winter hibernation. They’re searching for the earliest spring flowers and looking for the perfect underground burrow in which to start their colonies for the year (colonies that will number in the low hundreds of cute, fuzzy bumble bees).


A quick sugar-water fix

Quick Recipe

  • 1 part sugar crystals (not brown)
  • 1 part room temperature water

Mix vigorously, then offer small portion

The first thing to do is to feed your bee. A cold, hungry bee is nothing to fear (in fact, bees are nothing to fear anyway, and you’re probably not too worried if you’re reading this page… but if you are, keep in mind that a cold sluggish bee is in no position or mood to sting… they’re simply hungry and cold, and will be happy for any help you provide).

To feed your bee, mix up some organic granulated cane sugar or refined white sugar crystals to create a sugar-water solution. A 1:1 mix (50%/50%) is appropriate, and this can be achieved simply by stirring the sugar rapidly in room temperature water. Offer a small portion of this solution (just a drop or two to begin with) in a shallow lid or teaspoon placed near the bee’s head.

When drinking, you’ll see her long tongue (sometimes almost as long as her body) pointing down from her head. If you see her tongue extended, try placing drops of sugar-water mix directly beneath the tip (it functions like a straw). Not too much as a weakened bee may be clumsy, and you don’t want to make the situation worse by getting your bee covered in sugary water (which a sluggish bee may have trouble cleaning off, though she’ll be able to once she recovers her energy).

In most cases, your bee will recover quickly after drinking some sugar-water. Offering sugar-water often works even if it appears to you as though your bee is dead! A quick sugar-water fix should help your bee on its way to living another day 😌 It may take a few minutes or a few hours for her to recover, depending on how weak she was to begin with. Don’t be surprised to find your bee gone if you’re not keeping a constant eye on her!

Note that if it’s cold out (but otherwise good weather for bees), you’ll speed your bee’s recovery by warming her up. You may do this by placing her in direct sunlight, by letting her sit on your warm skin (a hand or arm), or by bringing her indoors briefly (in a ventilated box) to warm up and drink some sugar-water.

If it's not looking like good bee-flying weather, or if it's getting late and the sun is setting, you may want to consider housing your bee overnight to protect her from predators while she is in a vulnerable state.

Shared with kind permission by reader Christine


Types of sugar to avoid

It’s important to avoid brown sugar (which contains extra solids from molasses) and avoid maple syrup (which contains extra minerals), both of which are difficult for bees to digest. Also, do not use boiling water (when sugars caramelize at high heat, they can create indigestible and possibly bee-toxic compounds).

In years past, I advised feeding a drop of local raw honey, but this can be a vector for spreading bee diseases, so to be safe, avoid feeding honey. If you’ve fed honey in the past, don’t worry about it too much, chances are you likely helped anyway.

Avoid high fructose corn syrup at all costs, as compounds toxic to bees can be formed during manufacturing (as a result of overheating). And it should go without saying to avoid the fake stuff! I avoid conventional sugar because of possible pesticide residues (especially when sourced from sugar beets, which account for most sugar production and consumption in the United States; Monsanto licenses a Roundup Ready trait to sugarbeet seed companies).

Feeding bees sugar-water

The sugar-water solution I detail above should only be used in emergency situations. Sugar-water is not sufficient for bees’ nutritional needs long-term (they need all the other trace components of flower nectar for a balanced diet). Putting a dish of sugar-water out may attract bees, but it is not a good idea and it will not help bees in your area, however much they may appear to appreciate it as free food (it can also incense some bees and cause them to be more aggressive than they usually would be, as they compete for such an unusually easy food source).

Bees need pure water though! One of the best things you can do (especially on hot days) is to provide a large shallow dish of fresh water with pebbles in it so that bees may easily reach the water without falling into it. Honey bees in particular need water on hot days in order to cool their hives, and you may see a variety of pollinators and other insects coming to your water dish if you watch for any length of time!

Honey bee

Honey bee illustrating reddish tongue, by Ethan Kocak


John’s story of the ‘Bee that Stayed’

Reader John first wrote to me in reply to my post about how to revive a cold, wet, or exhausted bee. In his words: “I can’t believe this, I love Bumble Bees, and when I find one in the garden lying there exhausted, I mix a bit of sugar with water and let them crawl on my hand have a drink, then they sleep for 3 minutes and fly off revitalized. Well. I found one lying on the lawn in a bad state, so I did my usual, NOW he has stayed on my hand and won’t go away, he stayed there whilst I mowed the lawn, and he is still here 1 hour later, he has stayed on my finger whilst I am typing, so I put him on a piece of kitchen roll next to me on the table.” Read more


What if it’s cold or raining outdoors, or the sun has almost set?

Sometimes you’ll find a bee in need of help in unseasonable weather (especially in early spring when bumble bee queens are emerging from hibernation). After offering sugar-water, you may decide that the best thing to do is to keep your bee safe overnight. If it’s late at night and cold, or raining or even snowing outdoors, then releasing your bee may not be an option.

Base your decision on the time of day, the weather, and your observation of the bee… if it’s morning or afternoon, and she looks ready to go after sipping sugar-water, then she’ll likely want to bee on her way (even if it’s cool and a bit rainy). If it’s approaching evening or night, the weather is worsening, and the bee seems sluggish, her chances will improve by keeping her overnight (some people even end up keeping their bees several nights in a row, until the weather improves… just be sure to mimic as much as possible typical day/night light cycles and temperatures, so your bee doesn’t get confused).

In this case, it’s time to make a cozy home for your bee for the night. A shoebox works well for this (with small holes punched in it to provide ventilation). Although we like soft things to lie on, it’s best not to add materials inside the box, as things like fabric may catch on a sluggish bee’s feet and make moving even more of a struggle for her.

Place her in the box, and provide a little greenery too so that it’s not just a bee inside a stark, empty box. Generally speaking (for overnight stays), I’d avoid placing flowers in the box, as they will lose their nectar fairly quickly, and may confuse a bee looking for food. However, I’ve heard of times when having flowers inside the box is just the thing to “cheer up” a bee and speed her on her way. If the time of day and weather is just “iffy” and might still be good enough for your bee to go out in, then try adding flowers into her box and seeing if she buzzes around sufficiently to bee on her way. If you’re still left with a sluggish bee, remove the flowers but put something natural of interest in the box for the night.

Place the box somewhere that’s not too warm and not too cold… err on the side of cooler, simply because it’s going to simulate their natural environment better. But certainly don’t allow the box to sit in freezing temperatures! Somewhere “in-between” such as a garage, utility room, or other sheltered and lightly-heated area is ideal. I'd recommend removing any dish of sugar-water overnight, so as not to attract ants or risk the bee falling in. You can put it back again in the morning.

Gorgeous red-tailed bumble bee queen shared with kind permission by reader Emily

Check on your bee from time to time; if she’s full of energy and buzzing, she may well wish to take her chances outdoors. Bumble bee queens in particular are fairly well-equipped for unseasonable weather. Bumble bees are quite special in terms of their ability to decouple their flight muscles from their wings and vibrate (or “shiver”) in order to warm themselves up.

If your bee seems comfortable and settled in her box, then wait to release her until the weather is more favorable (at least 50-55°F or 10-12°C). Bees are not particularly early risers! On the next day of decent weather, make sure your bee has had a little sugar-water for breakfast, and then leave her box open in a sunny warm spot outdoors. Release your bee near where you found her, ideally near flowers where you see other similar bees foraging. It can take anywhere between minutes and hours for her to feel ready to leave. If you hang around watching for a little while, you’ll likely see her buzz around her box a bit first, before finally taking off happily!

A few years ago I read the most charming story about someone’s encounter with a bumble bee queen and how she rescued it with sugar water and a night in a shoebox. Read her inspiring story on the Bumblebee Conservation Trust website:

The Plight of the Bumblebee


Hosting tiny guests at an Air Bee-n-Bee in San Francisco

Today I heard from Ann in San Francisco with a question after she found my post about how to revive a cold, wet, or exhausted bee. Astonishingly, a queen bumble bee—carrying three little worker bees, no less!—had sought out Ann’s help in the garden. In her words: “Hi, I have a queen bee that visited my back patio yesterday and she kept following me around and trying to get under a bag of potting soil…I moved the bag and then her…to under a sunny bush…she was then crawling back to me! So I put down my glove and she hopped on and I found a more protected area of the lawn where she spent the night. Today she is back with three small bumble bees on her back she is not moving and will not drink its going to get cold and windy soon…what do I do???” Read more


How to save a drowning bee

Sometimes people see bees struggling in water, unable to reach anything that would give them a “leg up” and out to safety. The easiest way to rescue a bee from water is to use a leaf or some other object close-to-hand to scoop them up. If you rescue your bee from water, the first thing to do is to put her in the sunlight so she can dry out and warm up. While we generally prefer recovering in the shade, bees recover far faster in full sun.

Avoid handling the bee much, or attempting to separate the wings or correct other things that appear amiss. Warm sun will help “reactivate” the bee, after which she can clean herself (if she needs) much more gently and effectively than us. It’s also a good idea to offer a few drops of sugar-water mix as above, if your bee doesn’t take off soon after being scooped up and drying off somewhere warm.

If it’s too late at night for there to be any warmth or sunlight, then keep your bee overnight in a ventilated box following the suggestions above, and release her the following morning.


What if there are mites on the bee?

The bee mites we read about in the news are a very specific type of mite (Varroa destructor) that only affects honey bees because of their unique life cycle. If your bee is a larger, fuzzier bee, chances are it has harmless bumble bee mites instead. Bumble bees often have mites… they’re just far smaller mites, and they’re not dangerous for the bee. They’re typically “hitchhiking” to the bumble bee’s nest from flowers, where the mites then feed on small bits of detritus around the nest.

So there’s no need to try to remove tiny mites from bees you find. The only time they can be a problem is in rare instances when hundreds pile onto a bee at once, impacting its ability to fly. I’ve seen photos documenting this, but it really is unusual. Honey bee mites are far larger by comparison… it would be like one of us having a rabbit-sized tick feeding off us!


What if I’m out and about and find a struggling bee?

When I go for long walks in spring, I carry a small vial of sugar-water with me in case I see a struggling bee in need. This way I can drop a few droplets onto something like a leaf or flower (right below the bee’s head), in order to give it a top-up of energy. If you don’t have sugar water with you, you might instead try gently moving your bee (using a leaf or similar) onto nearby flowers where you (ideally) see other, similar bees foraging.

And if you'd love to carry sugar water with you at all times just in case you find a bee in need, I’ve discovered the neatest solution, complete with protective keychain carrying case for the glass vial! Although UK-based, they'll ship elsewhere too:

Beevive, inspired by a spontaneous encounter with a tired bee


What kind of bee is it?

There are so many different kinds of bees, but when you find a bee, it’s very often one of the more common types. If it’s large and fuzzy, it’s probably a bumble bee. If it’s really large and fuzzy, it’s probably a queen bumble bee (especially if it’s early spring). Honey bees are smaller by comparison, less fuzzy, and have that classic “striping” that we expect from seeing drawings of bees.

Honey bees need to get back to their hives for the night, but bumble bees can stay out a night or two just fine. Bumble bees are also capable of generating their own heat (which they do by decoupling their wings from their flight muscles and then “buzzing” to warm up)! Bumble bees are more likely to get caught out in bad weather, simply because they’re more likely to fly in cooler temperatures (even in the rain), whereas honey bees stay tucked in their hives on cold and rainy days.

So if you find a bee on a cold, wet day, it’s most likely a bumble bee. You can help a bumble bee by offering sugar-water and potentially keeping the bee overnight in a ventilated box (as above), especially if it’s late in the day and the weather is worsening. Release your bee the following morning once the sun is up, and offer sugar-water again to give the bee an energetic start to her day!

Honey bees are most often found in need of help when they’ve fallen into a pool of water on a warm day. Honey bees collect water in order to cool their hives, hence they face more dangers from falling into pools and ponds while trying to get to the water. Honey bees can be helped by simply removing them from the water and putting them in the sun (offering sugar-water helps too, especially if your bee almost drowned before you found her). If you consistently find yourself rescuing bees from pools of water near your home, try placing pebbles in a shallow dish of water nearby to provide them a safer place to drink, especially on hot days!

These are all bumble bee queens:

These are all honey bee workers:


All the Buzz!

Elise FogAn occasional email newsletter from Elise Fog (bee enthusiast), including gardening advice for particular times in the bee season, as well as discussion of curious bee facts, current scientific bee research, and other such bee-related goodness.

I only use your email address to send you occasional bee-related emails (opt-out any time). Read my full privacy policy.


A short note from Elise Fog

elise-fog

Hello, I hope your bee is feeling better! If you're still concerned, do drop your question below and I'll try to answer as quickly as I can. The response to this page has been incredible, and I've added to this page based on hearing so many bee stories.

I truly believe every single bee’s life counts. I also think that saving a bee’s life creates a special connection that will never bee forgotten. Sir David Attenborough once said something along the lines of: if you love something, you’ll care about saving it, but you won’t fall in love until you’ve seen and learned about it first.

If you find this website valuable, I’d so appreciate it if you consider supporting this project. One way is to support my bee art 🐝 Another way is with a one-time or monthly contribution 💛

Update: I am so sorry to all those who dropped bee questions here in the last year or so, that went unanswered by me. This has been such a hard time for many, and it is with much sadness that I report losing my home and bee meadow project to the Holiday Farm Fire on the night of Labor Day 2020. Climate change is real, and so destructive. We must act quickly as a species to mitigate the worst of the damage.


Have a bee question?

I only use the information you provide in order to help with your bee question. Read my full privacy policy for details.
Your email is important so that you know as soon as I reply, and also in case we need to exchange photos of your bee.


1213 responses to “How to help revive a cold or wet bee

  1. Hi, thank you for this article, I have visited it plenty of times, as I attempt to rescue bees weekly. Do you have any solutions for them to stop drowning in water ? I’m using a short container not deep, and I’ve placed wine corks as well as bamboo sticks to help them. It seems I’m still finding a few that fall in. I’m able to revive most with the sugar water trick and keeping them warm. I have a second problem , two have stung me and I’m scared they will pass because of it. I asked my bio professor , I sent a photo and he stated it seemed it might make it because of something that was stopping the bee from releasing its internals. I just want to help them live . Any suggestions ? Thank you Elise .

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Deanna Ruelas

  2. Hello, I live in the northeast and it is getting quite chilly. Today was 46 degrees and I found a honey bee on the brick wall of my house. I moved it to some flowers in the sun but it has been there for hours. I am not sure if it is cold or at the end of life. I didn't want to move it inside in case it was going to return to a hive, but now I am considering it because it's getting dark and much colder. It will be in the 20s tonight. Any bee advice would be welcome.🙂 Thank you!

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Donna

    1. OK just an update, I ended up bringing the bee inside with the flowers and some sugar water. It took no more than a few minutes and the bee was flying around the container trying to get out. I released the bee and it flew away. It is starting to get dark and it is cold, but I hope it gets home ok!

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Donna

  3. Found big bumble Bee in garden three days ago.. November.

    Wet. Thought it was dead, brought it in, nurturing it with beehive revival kit... Not flying.. What shall I do with it now please, it's very still today other than the odd leg coming up..

    Thank you.

    Kym

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Kym

  4. Found large bumblebee in our pool. Got it out rather quickly. Has been sluggish for 24 hours. Now in shoe box with sugar water. Any further ideas?

    Thanks!!

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Scott

  5. Hi, I found a bee in my kitchen this afternoon. The sun had already set, she looked dead but I could see her antennas moving. I placed her in a warm place and tried blowing warm breaths, she still looks paralyzed. So I gave her some of the water sugar mix, she drank it all. But still no other movements . What should I do?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Kimberly

    1. I would keep her indoors in a ventilated box overnight (in a relatively cool spot indoors overnight), then try releasing her in the morning, assuming you have some warmer weather tomorrow. It helps to warm them up well indoors first (just prior to releasing them), as well as offering more sugar water then as an energy boost.

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

  6. I have a very large wet looking bee that I found clinging to a wall

    Looking very sluggish. I have brought her in to dry and warm her up.

    I’m unsure if she is a queen bee or worker bee?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Selina

    1. Given the time of year, if she's very large, she's likely a queen bumble bee. Do you have any slightly warmer, less wet weather coming up? I'm hoping so! She'll be happier once she's drier and warmer, although I wouldn't warm her up too much tonight, since it's late in the day, and she might be fooled into thinking it's possible to fly again, while it's still a cold night out. Ideally, you'll be able to house her safely until the weather improves at least a little (closer to 12°C).

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

  7. I brought a struggling bumble indoors yesterday evening as it was getting cold. I didnt seem interested in sugar water, but did get a bit more active as it warmed up.

    This morning it is much the same, but still not the healthiest looking.

    The temerature outside is around freezing and is only forecast to reach a few degrees, I am worried that if I put it outside it will just get cold and die

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Pete C

    1. Is it a very large bumble bee, or a smaller one? I ask because at this time of year, large bumble bee queens are preparing to hibernate (or have already settled into their hibernation for winter), but smaller bumble bee males naturally die as the temperatures fall. Feel free to reply to my email with a photo if you'd like.

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

      1. I was hoping to share a pic as my situation is the same as above. I found what I thought to be a dead bee on my parents driveway but indeed was alive. I’ve let her out a few times but she’s neither moved out of both bee friendly enclosures and I think it’s bc it’s too cold out. Below 50°. I have given sugar water and some fresh flowers, which one she hates lol I go back to my parents to celebrate Thanksgiving and will travel with her one more time to let her go. I understand this is probably it for her or who knows. She did leave one enclosure only to go back in. She was left on a wood flower pot filled with soil. I was hoping she would of left and dug herself in the ground but she didn’t. Shes tried flying but can not. I don’t see anything wrong with her wings and she can fly a few inches but no cigar. I hope that I am helping more than I am hurting. My nature best friend says I could be ruining future generations if she’s a queen and I don’t let her do what she need to do. Ugg. Thank you for your insight and help! Happy Thanksgiving!

        Reply

        Leave a Reply to All things bugs

        1. It's probably just cold that's keeping her from flying far right now. It sounds as though you may not have a choice on which day to let her go, so if that's the case, I'd warm her up in the morning really well indoors close to a heat source (in her enclosure, as she'll be able to fly once she's fully warmed up). Keep a good eye on her, as you want her to be comfortable, and start buzzing her wings and looking ready to fly off. Offer her some more sugar water during this time too (it's important for her to have some energy for the day). Ideally a good start with energy and warmth will enable her to stay warm and aloft until she finds where she'd like to be. If she's a large queen bumble bee, then she'll be looking for a place in the ground to hibernate... but they don't like us to choose those spots for them, which makes it more difficult to help! This is a hard time of year for them, but with a little help, she may be able to survive to do her thing. You already saved her life, as she wouldn't have made it being stranded on a cold driveway.

          Reply

          Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

  8. My husband returned home from work his lunchpail had a ice block in it to keep his lunch cold in the bottom was a sweet little bumblebee. I mediately took him out warmed him up . gave him a bit of sugar water and a warm environment it’s been raining and my husbands works pretty far away wondered if I could let him loose here at a friends with lots of flowers in her garden. Well she adapt because it’s not Where we found her?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Bumbles friend

    1. Yes, your bee will adapt to a new area just fine, being a bumble bee! If your bee is a queen (a large fluffy bumble bee), then she'd be looking for a place to hibernate on her own over winter, and your friend's garden will be a good place for her to stock up on food, as well as a good place to overwinter. If your bee is a bumble bee worker, then she'll typically have no problems entering another nest, so long as she comes bearing nectar or pollen. If your bee is a male bumble bee (likely at this time of year, if your bee is smaller), then he'll be very happy in your friend's garden, as where there are flowers, there will be queen bumble bees to meet ☺️

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

  9. I live in CT and it's November 11th. I'm dogsitting and was trying to open the back door but was having trouble. So I started walking away till I felt something on my shirt so I tried to get it off, (my first reaction). As I did that I noticed it was a bee and at that moment it stung me. But I'm a person who cannot kill ants or bugs, etc. So I went to find it a few minutes later and it was alive on the ground. I put it on my hand, gave it sugar water, per your advice and it really helped. But it's night time now and not very warm (obviously bc it's November). So my question is, I don't know where it came from. It had to have been inside the spaces between the slider door? I don't see any other bees anywhere. I don't want to just release it to fend for itself. I'm letting it stay inside overnight. It tucked itself under a folded piece of paper. I don't want to disturb it so I'll let it be. Where should I release it? Just right outside the slider door on the deck? In a potted plant outside by the door? I'm sorry for the long message but I can't help my concern. Everyone in my life thinks I'm weird bc I can't kill bugs, etc. But I feel so guilty and can't do it. Please any answer or advice would be a great help. I think it's a worker honey bee going by your pictures.

    Thanks so much for doing what you do!!

    Aileen

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Aileen Johnson

    1. Hmm, if she's a worker honey bee, then she wouldn't survive stinging you, as part of her body would unravel (leaving the stinger embedded in your skin). Perhaps she's some other kind of bee, since honey bees are the only ones that lose their lives like this when stinging?

      It's always a good idea to release bees near where they were picked up. Most bees will have landmarks in mind, and depending on the type of bee, it can be important for them to know where they are when released.

      If she's alright in the morning (and once the day has begun warming), I'd offer more sugar water (warming her on your hand again, if you're up to that). Then I'd gently place her outside the slider door on the deck, ideally in sunshine if you have any. She doesn't have to be put exactly where she was found, just close by, so anywhere on the deck by the sounds of it, and the warmer/sunnier the location, the better, even if it's not quite where she ended up when you found her. Your whole deck should be part of her map of her surroundings.

      It's good that you care about the small creatures too... I think it's rather strange when people kill bugs simply because they're bugs. After all, our world depends on them existing, they're such vital parts of our ecosystems. And beyond that, like all living things, they deserve their chance at life. Bees have been found to be amazing learners, even passing on learned knowledge between generations (we see this with bumble bees).

      I appreciate hearing that you care about bugs too, and are looking out for your bee's best interests 💛🐝

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

  10. My bees seem to be stuck to my metal gazebo. I have noticed this happening inside the house on the glass windows this fall. I can send a photo to better show this.

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Patti Burden

    1. Are these honey bees? I sent you an email just after you wrote, feel free to reply with a photo if you'd like.

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

  11. Hello,

    I found a queen on the ground Sunday, I took her home and gave her some sugar water which she had and left her outside that night thinking she would wonder off, when I got up she was still there, so I brought her in and have set up a show box with flower and leaves, she slept over night last night and has been very active today moving around a lot so, I experienced her have a wee (I think, she rubbed her abdomen and I watched a fluid come out) she seemed more active after, I decided to release her because the weather was dry and it was midday, she didn’t want any sugar water and didn’t seem interested in flowers, I found a lovely sheltered spot ideal for burrowing, I left her for a couple of hours and thought I would pop there and see if she is there, I left the box Incase, well I looked and turned around and she was hanging onto one strand or stalk, the temp has dropped so I’ve bought her back in. She is still active but I would have goes after a couple of hours she would have done more (Burrow down or forage) any idea why she doesn’t want too? She can move her wings but doesn’t want too. I’ve had to put the lid on the box because I need to do housework, any idea what to use until it’s bed time? She snuggled down about 6pm last night. The weather is due to get better in a few days, so maybe I can keep her until then. Also, could she be full and that’s why she doesn’t want the sugar water? Many thanks Tina

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Tina

    1. If she's expended little energy, she's likely simply not hungry. Queen bumble bees also do need to be fairly well-warmed up before they're active, so even on a dry day, she may not have felt sufficiently warm to do too much (if there's any direct sun, it helps to put her in those spots, so she can soak up the warm rays).

      If I were you, I'd hang onto her for a few days until the weather gets better, offering sugar water during the days, but keeping her relatively cool throughout. On the morning of better weather, I'd warm her up nicely indoors, and see if she'll take more sugar water. Then find a spot in direct sun (if you have it), and see if that doesn't get her buzzing and on her way then!

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

      1. Hi Elise,

        Thank you for the reply, it’s hard to know what’s the right thing to do, so, I appreciate it.

        She was still active in her box around 530pm, she had a wonder one my hand and my partner brought some cut flowers home including lavender (he’s a gardener) so she has enough nectar but I will offer her the beevive sugar water as well, it’s definitely meant to be Sunny the weekend so I will keep her, what should she be doing Nov, foraging or hibernating or both and is she likely to prefer the ground to hibernate. What is their sight like? I did notice her one antenna wasn’t as functional (it’s there but a little different and she uses the right one more) can they still function and smell good etc when one is slightly damaged?

        Reply

        Leave a Reply to Tina

        1. In November, your queen bumble bee should be preparing to hibernate, which includes foraging to top off her fat reserves ahead of winter. She should also be looking for a spot to burrow in the soil, just below ground, in order to stay safe and frost-free while she hibernates.

          November brings iffy weather though, so it's a matter of judgment on the part of each bee. If she's caught out in the cold and rain, she'll go into a state of torpor, from which she'll emerge once the weather warms slightly. Since each bee is precious, it's nice to keep them safe when they're not able to move, since they can otherwise be found by predators that are still able to move at lower temperatures.

          By the way, there's no need to worry about her antennae, I've seen bees with half an antenna missing that are still able to lead normal foraging lives. It helps to have another antenna as a backup. Their sight is good (and their learning abilities are excellent too)!

          Reply

          Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

  12. Dear Elise,

    I have found an extremely weak (on its back) bumble bee inside my home. I guess it was inside my Halloween decoration that I git inside on Monday - today is Saturday. I offered sugar water, it took some now it is sitting in the corner of a box .... Temps outside are in the 20th at the moment, during the day maybe low 50th - frost at night for the next few days. What am I supposed to do to help it survive?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to BRIDGET

    1. I apologize for replying so late. Perhaps you found some suggestions on this page already, but if your bee is still with you, I would keep it until the weather looks better (higher 50s without freezing temperatures, ideally). Bees don't need much while they're with you, especially since it's a good idea to keep their box somewhere cool... that way they don't use much energy while you wait for better weather. It can be a good idea to leave sugar water in their box during the day, so long as they can't fall into it accidentally (and so long as there's no danger of ants).

      The idea would then be to warm up your bee well indoors at the beginning of the soonest upcoming day with better weather, making sure to offer sugar water, then placing your bee in the sun outdoors if possible. Depending on the type of bee, it may or may not survive winter naturally (honey bees need to make it back to their hive where they'll overwinter, for example, but only large queen bumble bees survive by hibernating).

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

  13. I was outside at a soccer game and a bee flew down out of nowhere. I lifted it up since it was upside down, but it’s really cold outside and it’s only 7pm, meaning it will only get colder and it will take a long time for the sun to finally come up. Any ideas? I want to help protect it.

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to irene

    1. I'm sorry for my late reply, which is of little use several days later, so I do hope you found some ideas on this page to help your bee. Typically, if it's late at night, it can be helpful to keep them overnight in a ventilated box or other enclosure, in a spot that's similar to nighttime temperatures but not freezing. In the morning, once the day starts to warm up, you can warm them by placing their box in a warm spot indoors, also adding a few drops of sugar water for them (enough to drink from, but not enough to fall in, if they're cold and clumsy). Typically it's a good idea to wait for the day to warm up for a couple hours before releasing them. Sometimes (depending on the weather) it can even be helpful to hold onto them for a day or two, releasing them once the weather is more favorable (warmer/less rainy).

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

  14. I was fishing in a lake and happened across a little bee. I was in a boat far enough from land. So I swept him up and held him till he dried off. He was doing good. Cleaned himself. He even started trying to fly but wasn’t very successful after many attempts. Otherwise seemed good. I was on the water for a while and he just hung out on the boat trying to fly for a while. Then I noticed he became very docile and I held him as he died. I was so sad. Do you think he was just too cold? Needed to feed?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Kali

    1. I think it's likely that your bee ran out of energy. I doubt your bee was too cold, if it was soaking up your body warmth. Bees tend to expend a lot of energy attempting to escape the water's surface tension. This might sound odd, but it's one reason to carry a small vial of sugar water on you, especially in spring and fall when there are fewer flowers and the weather is more uneven. At least it was a quiet and gentle passing for your bee.

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

  15. Hi! I have found a bee very lethargic in my home. I helped her to some sugar water and she perked up a bit, but she’s still dragging her rear and doesn’t even try to use her wings.

    It’s currently 11C here so I’m worried she might be a bit chilly or that there’s something else going on… how can I help her?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Andzelika

    1. Is she a large, fluffy bumble bee, by chance? 11°C is cold, but it's close to the lower edge of bee temperature tolerance (13°C is usually what I'd consider a minimum). Tonight I'd certainly keep her with you, if you still have her, leaving her container in a coolish room so as not to confuse her sense of day/night. Lethargy doesn't necessarily mean anything's wrong with her, other than being cold... same with dragging her rear and not using her wings, these again are often symptoms of simply not being warm enough to fly.

      If your day tomorrow looks to be decent weather, I'd start warming her up in the earlier morning indoors, offering her more sugar water, and then opening her container outdoors mid-morning so that she can ideally bee on her way. Don't be surprised if it takes her some time (a couple of hours) to leave. If there's any bright sunshine at all, definitely put her in the sun rays to soak those up!

      If tomorrow is cold and wet, but another day this week looks better, then I'd keep her in a coolish location indoors, offering sugar water from time to time (not too much, as they can be clumsy when cold, and you don't want her to fall into it and get coated in sticky water while she's cold). Then on the day with better weather, warm her up indoors, offering her more sugar water, and open up her container mid-morning outdoors.

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

  16. Help I found a small B I am not sure what kind it is It was raining today and the bee was laying on a fence post very sluggish I brought it inside and put it in a big mason jar but a coffee filter for a lead with a lot of holes in it. The baby is starting to fly but it’s dark out now and it is going to -3 or four tonight Celsius The high tomorrow is only +3°C with a low below freezing mark again my heart is breaking for this little baby I don’t know should I just let it outside Weather is warming towards the end of the week +9 with the temperature still below the freezing mark at night What do I do with this poor little creature I have a small cap in the jar with some sugar water I have not seen the bee take any yet hoping you can offer some assistance

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Denise

    1. I hope I'm not too late in replying, your bee should be fine with you for a few days and nights, while it's so cold outdoors. I wouldn't keep your bee too warm at night, put the jar somewhere cool (but not freezing) nightly, and keep the jar somewhere where it's not too warm during the day (keeping your bee cooler ensures it won't try to fly much while staying with you, and it doesn't harm them). I'd offer sugar water from time to time during the day, not too much to where your bee could fall in though, they only need a little! 9°C is still rather cold, but if that's the warmest day, I'd warm your bee up well indoors that morning (offering sugar water again, ideally seeing it drink), before trying to release it late morning (once it's warmed up outdoors a bit). This'll give your bee the maximum possible time out in warmer temperatures before nightfall, so that for whatever type of bee it is, it can get where it wishes to go 🐝💛

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

  17. I had a lovely experience today. I wear fingerless gloves because of eczema and a bee decided to hitch a ride inside it! I had to carefully remove the glove and let it explore the inside and outside as I walked to my destination. It was incredibly curious and rejected every flower I showed it lol. Though it did at least take a look. It preferred to explore the glove or sit on the top in the sun.

    Was it tired do you think? When I passed the corner it flew off, almost as if that was its stop! As someone allergic to bees I was frightened at first but now feel very fortunate to share her little journey.

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Chloe

    1. I bet your bee simply wished to warm up on your hand/glove! Warmth can really give them a boost depending on the time of day/year. Happy to hear you shared in her little journey too, despite your allergies... bees tend to be friendly and docile under almost all circumstances! 🐝✨

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

  18. Hi I have found a bunch of bees 4 near my sunflower plants on the sunflowers and stem it’s cold and rainy today about 50-54°f the first two I for sure thought were dying I brought them inside an they perked up I picked the sunflower they were on I shouldn’t have done that but anyway I brought them back out when I realized they livened up aNd werent on there death bed but then I read ur article the suns almost setting I found one bigger one who’s now quite active after sucking down some sugar water, I have all 4 in a shoe box. Can I house them all? I also read in ur article that depending on what type of bee that they need to go back to the hive so I’m confused what to do. Keep them or not.. thanks jess

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Jess

    1. Are they all quite fluffy? I'm guessing so, and if yes, then they're bumble bees, not honey bees with a hive. They should all be fine together if they all look very similar (the larger one might be a young queen, with three males, if they're bumble bees). Put the box in a cool location to match the outdoor temperatures, so that they settle down for tonight. Then release them once it starts warming up tomorrow morning, offering some more sugar water beforehand.

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

    2. Hi again, I’ve separated the other three from the largest because he/she was climbing on top of the others and very active in comparison. I guess I will keep them all overnight…??? but the weather for tomorrow is rain 100% and 54°f. They have organic raw sugar cane water, I’ve seen all of but one of them drink it, maybe the last one has as well and I’ve just not noticed. Any who, it’s 6pm here suns setting and it’s getting dark. the largest is trying to fly inside the shoebox. Debating releasing her(him?) because of how active it is.

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Jess again

      1. Just saw your second message! If the largest one is trying to fly, maybe release her soon, so she doesn't wear herself out trying to escape. Though I bet she'll calm down if you put her somewhere cool for the night, to be released in the morning. Tomorrow's weather is not ideal for releasing them, but as I mentioned in my article, bumble bees often end up spending their nights out on flowers at this time of year, even in the rain. They enter a state of "torpor" that makes them appear half-dead, but they come back to life once it warms up a little! You can always give them a head-start on a cool, rainy day by warming them up in their box indoors first, and offering sugar water. They do generate their own warmth a bit too, so if they're able to fly tomorrow morning, then they should all be good to go.

        Reply

        Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

        1. Thanks for the response wondering if maybe they were okay where they were, hanging out on my sunflower plants.

          .. Besides flowers where do bumble bees live and normally stay during the night?

          The boxes are now on my front porch, no heat there 52°f out right now. They have quieted down. It’s dark now, not raining but rain is forecasted for overnight and tomorrow. I draped leaves into the shallow bottoms of solo cups where the sugar water is (the dishes are about 5mm deep) and I removed all flowers but I wonder if I’m doing anything better for them if the weather will be just as rainy and cold as it was today. They have all drank the sugar water when I first got them but not so much anymore. If it is raining tmrw morning what do you suggest I do with them? Thanks!

          Reply

          Leave a Reply to Jess

          1. Unless it rained very hard (washing them off the sunflowers), they'd likely have been alright there. Usually bumble bees live in nests (of up to several hundred individuals) underground, but in fall all the bumble bees leave their nests, basically young queens (large and fluffy) and male bees (smaller and fluffy). The males tend to hang out on flowers, awaiting female bees. The young queens are looking to mate and stock up on energy before hibernating in the ground for winter (unfortunately, all the males will die off relatively soon, as they have no place to go for winter).

            My advice depends on your forecast for the rest of the week. If it looks better mid-week, you could easily keep them in their boxes for another day and night, since they'll all likely be sluggish if it's wet and cold out. Likely they're safer with you too, rather than paralyzed with cold out on the flowers, where a predator might find them more easily.

            I'd peek into the boxes at various points tomorrow. If they start to seem much more active, even while the boxes are outdoors, then you could open the lids and give them the chance to go. You may find they'll stay until it's a nicer day!

            Reply

            Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

            1. Hi Elsie, you’re great by the way! You have helped so many people and I can’t tell you how much I appreciate your responses! It is a rainy crumby day, I’ve kept them over night, pretty sure they’re all males. Some bigger than others but none that are super super fluffy. Rain and wind is likely until tomorrow (wed) morning.

              My next and final questions lol They are certainly sluggish, haven’t moved all night, I’m thinking it’s doubtful they will take any of the sugar water being so cold, they only drank when I had them inside yesterday and warmed up, and since I think they’ll decide to stay put in their open boxes, should I bring them inside to warm up and eat at any point? Should I do this now (Tuesday 9:30am) and then leave them outside with box open? You mentioned that I could do this just before releasing them for a head start, which tomorrow is likely to be the better day.

              I have already taken the boxes and left lids completely open on my open porch so they’re free to go if they want but it’s a cold 52°f, windy and raining.

              Thank you so much!

              -Jess from CT!

              Reply

              Leave a Reply to Jess

              1. *Elise,

                my apologies!

                Reply

                Leave a Reply to Jess

                1. I'm on a different time zone than you, so forgive my later reply this morning. Tomorrow (Wed) sounds much better for their departure. That's the day I'd bring them indoors earlier to warm them up, offering more sugar water before putting their open boxes out in the sun (if there's sun).

                  For today, they'll likely not need much of anything, since they're cold and not moving much. I'd almost say to leave sugar water in the box in case they feel like it, but that's not ideal, since ants are more active at cooler temperatures, and might annoy the bees if they found the sugar water first.

                  So, if they're still out on the porch, I'd leave them there so that if they feel up to it, they can go anytime. Otherwise tonight I'd close up the boxes, and in the morning bring them in for warming up and breakfast before setting them out, ready to fly!

                  Reply

                  Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

  19. I found a cold worker bee inside of grocery store while working. I put them inside a warm box with some sugar water and is now happily walking around. The problem is the weather is terrible and I want to take it home for the night. I want to try and release them in the morning, but I live a mile away from the store. Is that too far away to release them?thanks!

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Miles

    1. If it really is a honey bee worker, I’d definitely take it back to the area outside the store tomorrow morning… it might not find its way back to its hive otherwise, but I’m sure it’s happy for a safe night with you! Keep it coolish tonight so it doesn’t get confused, then warm it up in the morning and offer more sugar water before releasing it 🐝💛

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

  20. Hi there,

    So my partner are new beekeepers. Our hive is only a few months old and we set it on a rubber pallet. The pallet has different grooves in it and so we laid a piece of plywood down to keep the hive stable but off the ground. Plywood only covers half of the pallet and the grooves that are exposed have water in them from the rain. Today when we went to check the hive we were looking for the queen to make sure she was moving around and doing okay. Well she was on the bottom corner of one of the frames and I don’t know how but she fell and of course she landed in the water. We quickly got her out by putting a finger under her and she climbed on and we set her right back on the top of the frame and she walked right down into the hive on the frame. We are paranoid she might die. Would you have any suggestions for us? Did we accidentally kill her? Will the bees dry her off and she will be okay? She’s back inside the hive and we closed it up right after but we are nervous. Can you calm our nerves lol? Thank you!

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Gayle

    1. I’m so sorry I didn’t reply sooner (unexpected life issues)… but do not worry, your queen bee will be fine! Bees can take a little falling in water if they’re immediately taken out… and as queen bee, she’ll have plenty of attendants to dry her fully 🐝👑

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

  21. Not a question! I just wanted to let you know that your first aid section helped me save a bee this morning! I would love to share my pictures/videos with you if you would like! I linked your website on my Facebook post.

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Sarah

    1. I'm so happy to hear you saved a bee! 💛 Thank you for sharing my page, and yes I'd love to see your pictures/video 🐝✨ Feel free to reply directly with them!

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

  22. Is a 2:1 mixture alright with organic raw cane sugar? I just made a max of it in a kitchen oil bottle for a griddle, the one with a nozzle like a bottle of honey. I filled the bottle halfway with the sugar, then fully with water, shook until dissolved, and I now have a murky brown solution that particles of sugar can be seen in. Will this work for the honey bees that fall in my pool almost daily here in Florida? I have been giving them honey but just found your page saying I shouldn't. My two young sisters have appointed me as the "Bee Doctor", and I want to be sure the "Bee Medicine I just made will work!

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Justin Fernandez

    1. Sorry to be replying so late! It'll likely work just fine as is, but ideally the sugar water goes into solution, without too many particulates. You might try warming the solution up a little (perhaps pouring the contents into a saucepan with a low heat, then once it cools, pouring it back into the bottle)? The solution should be a light-ish color too (with light-colored raw cane sugar rather than brown cane sugar).

      Happy to hear you're the appointed "Bee Doctor" with your own medical kit! 🩺🐝

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

  23. I brought my flowers in 2 nights ago to keep from freezing, I now have a honey bee hanging out in my bathroom, I did give a little sugar water and regular water it also has access to flowers. It is to cold out to release it. I feel bad for it and don't want it to die. What should I do for the poor thing. Or do I have a house guest for the winter😊 any suggestions would be helpful!! Thank you

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Ruth

    1. I am so sorry I didn't reply sooner (some life issues), but if you still have your honey bee, it does ideally need to find its way back to its hive. It'll be able to survive winter in its hive, but it needs to be at least 55° F (ideally above that) for it to be able to fly there. You can help it out by warming it up indoors too, on what looks like one of the better days weather-wise. It would likely get a bit lonely staying with you for winter, even with access to flowers, if it's a honey bee! They're definitely hive creatures, huddling close together in winter.

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

  24. Its a 21c rainy day. I found a big bumblebee on my wet marigold. I moved it off and put it on the moss in the flowerbox. Im sure it was dying. I went to check it hour later and it was gone! Did it live? It really seemed to be dying!

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Janet

    1. That's a fairly warm day. The likelihood is that once it dried off, it was able to fly away happily! It's easy to mistake lethargic bees for dying bees... often all they need is some warmth (and to dry off, if they're wet) before seemingly miraculous revivals. Sometimes nectar (or sugar water) is necessary, but if there are flowers nearby, they'll manage to get there, even if they have to walk instead of fly at first (large queen bumble bees especially).

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

  25. I have found a bee in left out orange juice. I have recovered him and put him in a box. But he seems lethargic and his wings are likely sticky. Is there anything I can do?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Rich

    1. If the bee is lethargic, it may have trouble cleaning itself before the orange juice dries. You could try very carefully dripping slightly-warmer-than-room-temperature water over the bee. But that is a little risky, you'd want to be very careful not to use too much at once (they breathe through the sides of their bodies). I'd probably try doing it though, since having its wings stick together from the orange juice would be worse. Bees are usually good at cleaning themselves, but not if they're already cold and lethargic. I don't know what time of day it is where you are, but even were your bee to warm up sufficiently to clean itself, the orange juice would likely have dried also in the process.

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

      1. I’m in the UK, it is now dark. I’ve tried dripping some water on his back. He’s extending his wings, but he’s gaining any lift.

        Reply

        Leave a Reply to Rich

        1. That's good to know where you're at, daylight-wise, as it helps to know what to do for your bee. I'd leave it at what you've done for now, and keep your damp bee safe overnight in a ventilated box. I wouldn't expect your bee to be able to dry out and "buzz up" until being warm again, but I do think it's good to have tried to dilute any orange juice residue (especially on its wings), so that it's able to move easily come morning. For tonight, I'd keep your bee somewhere cool-ish indoors, so that it doesn't think that it's warm enough to try to fly in the box. In the morning, once the day begins warming (hopefully you do have a warmer day ahead, without rain!), I'd put your bee out in the sunshine and give it an hour or two to get going. It might not need that long, but it depends on the type of bee. I'd also provide some drops of sugar water in the morning. If it's a cooler day, you can also try warming up the bee first in a warmer room indoors, along with offering sugar water, and then taking its box outdoors. Let me know if anything comes up with which you need further advice!

          Reply

          Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

  26. Hello love i ve rescued a honey bee from spider web gave it some sugar and water but it went on his legs i took him inside to warm up as it was getting late 6pm and now in a box quiet i dont know id he ok or not he been buzxing around in box now quiet ahould i let him go now kr morning and how many holea doea he need on box ive done about 10

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Alexandra ferrey

    1. It'll be safest for your honey bee to wait to release it in the morning, keeping its box in a relatively cool location so that it doesn't start buzzing about and wasting energy. I would say that not buzzing is likely a good sign (too much buzzing in an enclosure can add stress, and occasionally cause bees to damage their wings trying to escape). Ten holes for air in the box sounds great!

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

  27. It is October in western Massachusetts. The bumblebees are still on my flowers and it’s 55 out on an. Do I leave them alone or do they need help? They are sluggish but can fly. Although there are many. Some are just I guess waiting for the sun . But as cold weather approaches if they are still here how can I help them?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Susan

    1. At this time of year, what you're seeing are likely all male bumblebees, awaiting new queens dispersing from nests, who need to mate before going into hibernation for the winter. This is typical beehavior for males... so I would simply enjoy the autumn bee-watching! They'll be sluggish on these cold mornings, but they'll warm up quickly in the sun, and they're right on the flowers , so all the food they need is already there. Queen bumble bees are sure to come by later in the day, since they're stocking up their own fat reserves for overwintering.

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

      1. Thank you. There was many of them all the same in size. Still there eating. Good to know it didn’t warm up to much today. I’m sure they be okay until frost weather comes and hopefully safe by then . If not what do you do leave them or put them in a container for winter?? Clueless but I don’t want them to die. I plant flowers for the bees and milk pod for monarch butterflies. Do daily feeders for the hummingbirds . I sure don’t want to cause any harm.

        Reply

        Leave a Reply to Susan

        1. It's lovely to hear you care so much about your bumble bees and other wildlife. I'm sorry to say that life isn't too kind to male bumble bees (or older queens) by the first hard frosts. It is only the newly born, freshly mated queens who hibernate through winter, each alone in the ground, before awaking next spring to start new colonies. This year's queens (who in late summer gave birth to the new queens and males), along with all the male bumble bees, no longer maintain a colony through the winter, and so those bees will sadly all die from cold and lack of food. It's simply part of the natural bumble bee lifecycle, and I'd imagine that even if one were to try to intervene by keeping them warm and fed, their natural lifespan would not be much longer, and they'd not be outdoors roaming free, so it would be a strange existence for them.

          Reply

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  28. Excellent article. From my company (extintores online

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    Leave a Reply to Samuel

  29. Hi, we brought a bee inside as it was cold and just laying there early this morning. It's fed well on sugar and water, generally been asleep on the window cill. It's showing interest in going outside but it can't seem to open it's wings. Any advice on to what we could do for it? Kind regards

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Kay

    1. Another quick note... I realize it's later in the evening where you are, so these would be steps to take tomorrow morning, assuming it'll be a temperate day tomorrow. Sometimes, depending on the weather, it's worth keeping bees fed and safe for a few days, before warming them up and releasing them on one of the warmer autumn days.

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

    2. Is it a bumble bee? They take a surprising amount of time to get going on cooler mornings, and it is likely that she's still cold, rather than anything wrong with her wings (if you see nothing amiss). So long as it'll be a reasonably temperate day today, I'd warm your bee up indoors (in some kind of enclosure) first, and see if she starts buzzing her wings, indicative of preparing for flight. Placing her near (but not too near) a heat source can help jump-start her day, giving her energy to fly and more time in her day, once she's released. Keep an eye on her throughout the time you're warming her up.

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

  30. I fed a mason bee honey I've heard it can cause diseases. What should I do to help this bee?

    I'm very concerned.

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Mina

    1. I would try not to be too concerned about it (simply making sure to use sugar water for helping future bees in distress). It would really depend a great deal on the honey too, in terms of the likelihood of any possible bee disease transmission. My intuition is that if it's a more standard, ultra-filtered honey, it's less likely to cause an issue than an unfiltered, raw honey (mainly owing to the heat treatment of more processed honeys). Honey is also probably more likely to cause potential issues for honey bees, rather than mason bees, but I'm not certain on this point. In any case, there's no undoing it, and it certainly would have provided energy to your bee, so that's a plus.

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

  31. Okay so I have a mammoth sunflowers outside my apartment. They get a lot of good sun but it’s starting to get colder because it’s fall I live in Pittsburgh. Anyhow I noticed this one particular bee has literally not moved from this flower in three days he’s moving just a little bit (or she) so they are not dead but like I don’t know if it got cold or wet or something because it has been raining a lot but like I need to save it LOL and I’m not sure the best way to do it. I noticed because the nights are going down to like 50° It seems to be moving but just barely and hasnt left that flower in days. there’s also this other one that looks like a queen it’s so big that also is now doing the same thing- its acting slow and hasnt moved since yestwrday around 3 pm- like it’s like really looks like it’s kind of frozen this morning like it doesn’t really move even and I can touch it and it doesn’t even really react.

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Chloe

    1. I'm assuming these are bumble bees? I wouldn't bee too concerned about either of the bees currently, though I do hope there are at least a few days of dryer, warmer weather coming up? Both spring and fall typically feature variable weather, and what happens is that when it is too cool (especially when it's also rainy), bumble bees tend to stay put, even if that means spending several days and nights out on the same flowers.

      Any queens out at this time of year are also new queens, having dispersed from their communal nests of summer, with plans to mate and then find a suitable place to hibernate overwinter. So it's unsurprising to find new queens out at night, having no place to call home as of yet. Male bumble bees also tend to spend nights out on flowers, awaiting new queens in the daytime.

      Bumble bees (especially queen bumble bees) also take more energy for liftoff than most bees, and that's another reason that on cooler, wetter days, you'll find the same bumble bees staying put. It's only a problem if, say, a bird spots them and nibbles them up while they can't move (since bees enter a state of torpor when cold), but most bumble bees manage to survive out each night, awaking to plentiful food each morning while spending their nights on flowers.

      So I'd keep an eye on both bees, and your upcoming weather forecast, but there's likely no need to intervene yet. In the event that no warmer, dryer weather is forecast for some time, you might try warming them up indoors in a ventilated enclosure, and offering sugar water. But that would only be something to do on a dryer day with temperatures closer to 60 F, around 10-11am or so, basically to give the bees energy to get going around when the day begins warming up... this can be especially helpful to young queens, as it'll give them a boost on a day that they might otherwise miss, to continue searching for the perfect place to hibernate.

      Queens are also building up stores of energy at this time of year, but it's best they get those from flower nectar rather than sugar water, for all the essential amino acids and other trace elements from which they benefit. Keep me updated if you'd like!

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

  32. Thank you so much for this cool post.

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Anderson

  33. I found a bee in my pool!! I believe it could have been in there for 10-15 minutes but got it out as soon as possible and warmed her up with my breath, she regained movement. I took her inside and placed her in a box as you suggested and attempted to feed her sugar water but I do not know if she is drinking it, she cannot balance either but still tries to move around. Her tongue is always sticking out and I (from what I have read) has been poisoned by the chemicals. I’m not an expert in bees nor insects but based off the situation, do you think she still has a chance? She has been inside for about 3 hours and hasn’t improved anymore since I brought her in… help!

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Mali

    1. It does take time for bees to recover, but she may sadly have been in your pool for too long. Bees breathe along the sides of their bodies, so being immersed in water is dangerous. I don't know if the pool has chemicals, but chlorine particularly wouldn't be kind to a bee, on top of almost drowning. Her tongue sticking out isn't necessarily a sign of poisoning, but it is something that you'll see when they're nearing their end. Other than warming her up, and putting drops of water near the tip of her extended tongue, there's little to do besides make her comfortable. I've seen many bees revive with time, warmth, and sugar-water, but it does depend how long she struggled in the water before you found her. If you don't already have a dish of fresh water with pebbles in it outdoors, you might try putting one out, with the hope of attracting thirsty bees to a safe drinking spot, instead of ending up in your pool accidentally.

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

  34. I’m finding bee resin or spit or something on the mason bees tubes

    Looks like big bumblebee types spending hours on the outside of the filled tubes

    Just took the nest down and yes, this gelatinous substance all over,

    What is it and is it harmful?

    Thanks so much ….Connie

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Connie

    1. I believe you may be hosting giant resin bees, which are large bees native to Japan and China. Their mandibles are not strong enough to create their own nesting cavities, so they love using ones that carpenter, mason and leaf-cutter bees might use as well. True to their name, resin bees do coat the outside in resin that they gather from plants. There is some concern that they may displace native pollinators (particularly carpenter bees), however they are also good pollinators themselves. Since the resin bees are later-season pollinators, they may compete with leaf-cutter and carpenter bees, but mason bee young should all be sealed safely away before resin bees become active. Anecdotally, it looks as though resin bees may sometimes turn out the young of other bees though, which would be concerning. It's advisable to protect mason bee tubes once the mason bees finish their active lifecycle by gently transferring the mason bee tubes to a pest-free, dry environment (at the same temperature as the outdoors, ideally in an outbuilding), ensuring they're placed back outdoors before emergence in early spring.

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

  35. Hi Elise, we have been following your advice.

    Our little fluff was found under water in our paddling pool.

    Still moving.

    We have had fluff 24 hours now ...and fluff is moving about but looks exhausted. We have offered sugar water and we 'think' fluff is taking it. Fluff keeps moving his/her legs and stroking her head etc.... What else can we do XX thank you and hope you are really well XX Pippa and John. Wirral u.k 🌺🐝🌻

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Pippa

    1. In the morning, try offering more sugar-water... and look to see if her tongue pokes out, it'll be quite noticeable if so. Tomorrow mid-morning, I would put Fluff outside, ideally in bright sunshine if you have it. Alternatively, if it'll be a cool day out, first warm Fluff up well indoors, and then see if she'll fly off outdoors around mid-morning ☀️🐝

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

      1. Hi Elise,🌹

        An update of Fluff. 🌼

        I bathed her in today's warm sunshine. Our first day of sun since Saturday when we found her.

        I moved her shoe box so she was positioned nicely in full sun.

        I offered her sugar water and she again declined.

        Then about 90 mins later I heard her buzzing and trying to fly... Her first effort since Sat.

        And she did great, flying towards the window.. she banged into the glass.

        So I placed her on cotton wool pad and sat her in the window ledge again in sunshine. About 20 mins later she flew off into the garden and across.

        Hooray.. she has her second chance at life. We feel so grateful to have helped.

        And thanks to your advice. she finally got her freedom. 💟🐝👋😍😚💚

        I took videos.

        Kindest and loving Regards

        Pippa and John.

        Wirral U.K.

        xx

        Reply

        Leave a Reply to Pippa

  36. I live in Massachusetts (Zone 6 in the plant world) and I'm finding as many as one to three bumble bees a night who are sluggish and clutching the centers of my two clumps of Helenium. They are there in the morning (I just saw the same three as last night). It's about 68-70 degrees out in the evenings and right now, about 65 degrees in the morning. Later in the day, they'll be gone. Do bumble bees slow down as the temps drop (it's cool, but I didn't think it was 'cold' for bees yet but you tell me). During the day, there are as many as 7 bumble bees at a time on each mound of flowers and they're buzzing happily, healthily and actively. I don't want to do the sugar water treatment if they're just resting or if this is OK because I figure the less handling the better. I did try the sugar water treatment with one 3 nights ago. It didn't drink for a few minutes, but when I transferred it to the dish with water, it did activate and buzz a bit. I went indoors, came out 2 minutes later and the bee was gone. Sugar water? Stressed and evading me, the 'predator', using up valuable energy?? I don't want to stress the bees unnecessarily by handling them, but the regular occurrence has me puzzled.

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Anne

    1. Bumble bees and other bees do slow down as temperatures drop... even 60s may feel cool to them, especially to bumble bees, as they take a bit more energy to get off the ground. I've frequently seen bumble bees hanging out on flowers throughout the night... even looking quite damp in the morning when there's a shower! Male bumble bees often do, and it's nothing to worry about... they'll begin their days once they warm up, with fresh nectar for breakfast 😋

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

  37. Hi.

    I rescued a tree bumble bee who had a damaged wing.

    I thought this would be just a couple of days some nice sugar water and a comfy place to go to bee heaven but 44 days later I still have my little guest.

    As there was no way she could fly I added some local honey and pollen to the box to feed her and lots of fresh flowers.

    Yesterday she fell back first into the honey and is very unhappy now.

    Her proboscis reflex is stuck with it out now because she can not clean all the honey off her self.

    I am wondering if there is anything I can do to help her.

    Bumble bees can cope with rain so would a gentle misting help?

    Or could I try a damp Q tip?

    Thank you in advance

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Del

    1. I would try to dissolve the honey with slightly-warmer-than-lukewarm honey (but err on the side of cooler-lukewarm first... you want just enough warmth to help liquify the honey). I'd probably use a dropper rather than a mister, to target the honey better, and also because you could get just a little more pressure with a dropper, in terms of removing the honey. Make sure to do this earlier in the day, as she won't want to be sopping wet all night. Ideally you could use a dropper to clean much of it off, and then let her warm up and dry out throughout the day, with good air flow and plenty of warmth. This is challenging, but with patience and water, you may have some luck getting a large amount off her, leaving her to do the fine-tuning, cleaning-wise. I wish you and your bee all the best, it's kind of you to take care of her when she can't fly, and I imagine you must have developed quite the kinship with her at this point ☺️

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

      1. Thank you.

        I used a q tip soaked in luke warm water and gently dabbed/stroked her.

        Safe to say she was true to character and pretty unimpressed about this process but she did’t throw a total fit.

        Her proboscis is still out but she is much more active after the “bath”.

        All in all I think its worth while trying as she seems happier.

        As we are in Norway and she is a spring bumble bee (pretty sure she is a queen) so normal temps for her are low, I am keeping her fully ventilated box at a warm 23c (using a no touch thermometer) ….she is indoors in the living room but I will check in the night and if below 20c add some boiling water in a jar next to but not touching the box to keep heat up.

        She is pretty dry now but not bumble fluffy…going to break the bad news we need another bath in the morning.

        Thank you for understanding my crazy bee lady vibe….after over a month she is a little family pet!

        If you want I will let you know how we do…maybe one day it will help over bees. Oh and the offending honey bowl now has a mesh cover so she can drink but not fall in!

        Reply

        Leave a Reply to Del

        1. I would love to know how she is getting along! Although she may be near the end of her natural lifespan (typically 2-6 weeks for worker bumble bees, though she's certainly safer with you than out foraging in the wild). I'm sure she's given everyone in your family a closer connection to bumble bees ☺️

          Reply

          Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

          1. Hi.

            Sadly we lost her a couple of days ago.

            The baths got a lot of the honey off…she almost seemed to be drying herself on the the rough heather plants after them and we used an aquarium lamp to help her keep warm when still wet.

            She was accepted the bathing…I even found 2 bee mites I was able to pluck off her with a strong magnifying glass and tiny electrical work tweezers!

            She was really busy and happy the last day but then just went in the space of an hour.

            Reply

            Leave a Reply to Del

  38. hi, so i had some bees in the a little plasic box that we stored pillows in a storm came by and knocked it over the had 3 hives along the lid and now it kinda broke and there all hudled on the outside corner and havent even really moved for a day

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to hailey

  39. I found a honey bee wet and floating on a petal in my garden fountain. I placed the poor little thing on a daisy but it fell off into a border bush and I can't find it now. It's 615 pm and it's an overcast and very warm and muggy summer day. I do hope it will survive. Bees are the whole reason for my pollinator garden.

    Poor wee things...

    Think my rescue will save this one?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Heidi

  40. Yesterday I discovered a bumble bee on our steps that seemed to be a bit tired. It just sat there. I thought maybe it was a bit thirsty so I sat a soda cap of water next to it and let it be. Today I found that very bee on the sidewalk on it's back struggling and seemingly panicked. It would stretch out its rear legs and bend inwards, almost like it was doing sit ups or trying to sting itself. Kinda convulsing if you will. I rushed to help. I figured it probably hadn't had any nourishment since I last discovered it so I gave it the 2:1 ratio of water and sugar(granulated white sugar) through a medine syringe like you get in a childrens tylenol bottle(well washed and no medicine residue). She seemed thirsty and drank vigorously. I didn't press on the syringe, I just put it near her head and she drank what was in the tip. Her panicked disposition subsided shortly after and she began to gain some control. Since I found her(I assume her) I had noticed she was favoring her front left leg(she held it in and kept rubbing it with the leg behind it, as well as kept rubbing her eye). Its getting near dark and she has since not favored it as much. My biggest concern at this point is that since I fed her the sugar water she has started this "panting" from her proboscis and maxilla. It's been non stop ever since. Other than that she seems fine. She gets around, still doesn't use her front limb very much but has stretched it out in a normal fashion. We have her in a cheap little bug carrying case for her protection with the door opened for when she feels strong enough to be on her way. But she has stayed in it, venturing to the doorway but not going out. Since getting dark she has climbed to the top to slumber I assume. I'm just so afraid I messed up giving her the sugar water. She seems content but the proboscis moving in and out has me worried. I'm not a seasoned bee rescuer so I merely looked up ways to help. I love bees and what they do for the world and try to help when one needs it. I guess I should also mention that she seems in good health, no tattered wings or body. I know they don't live that long but she has succeeded in making it since I first discovered her and I feel like if she was on her way out it would've happened by now. Anyway, I've not been able to find anything out about it and I saw your ask a question section and thought maybe you could help. Thanks in advance.

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Sarah

    1. Sorry, in reading everything back to myself for incorrections I noticed I accidentally hit 2:1 instead of 1:1 ratio. I'm typing on a cell phone and have fat fingers lol. Sorry for the misinformation.

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Sarah

  41. Hi. I've just emailed and on sending you that question, checked the bee in the box and she was ready to go. I took her outside to the flowers and got the bedraggled bee in the box and is inside now.

    Thank you.

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Val

  42. Hi. I have a bumble bee in a box inside at the moment. Found on the garden floor during torrential rain. I have also found another bumble bee in my garden that needs help.

    Can I put the 2 bumble bees together in the same box?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Val

  43. It's late at night bumblebee was found in water I've given it sugar water it's trying to fly but can't get off the ground should I keep it inside or put outside

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Lena Carville

  44. Hi

    My bird box has been overtaken with tree bees for two years now. Although I am a bit scared of them I would never want them taken away or harmed. For three days now there has been no activity. I know they are still there as on one of the three days four come out. Is this normal please. The weather here just now is really hot (mid 20s). Well hot for Scotland anyway lol. Would appreciate advice on this please x

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Rhona

  45. I found a bumble bee on my lawn three days ago and it was in a poor condition. I placed the bee on my garden furniture and gave it a drink of sugar water. I checked an hour later and it was still there but walking around and looked to be exercising it’s wings. The next morning it was still there, still walking around and exercising it’s wings. Later in the day I gave the bee some more sugar water, which it took. This morning, after a stormy night the bee is still here. Why won’t it fly off? Or even can it fly off?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Billy

  46. In the middle of my parking lot on the asphalt there was a swarm of bees 10,000 I am guessing. We swept them up and relocated them to a flowering bush. They are now dead. I have never seen this before have you?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Jim Levante

    1. it could of been the queen bee making the workers do to much

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Indy

  47. I regularly help struggling bees. I have just come across a buff tailed bumble which doesn’t seem interested in my sugar water offering.. it’s climbing around in earnest, and takes flight for a very short burst but obviously can’t sustain prolonged flight.. any suggestions??

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Tom

  48. Hello!

    I found a bee on its back and helped it onto its front. It kept flopping back over but I managed to balance it upright on a twig. I gave it some sugar water but although it put its legs in, it didn't look like its tongue was extended to drink any. I have sinced moved the bee into a flower to keep it upright and close to pollen. It's now almost 3 hours since I found it and although she is still alive (atenna still move) she hasn't made any effort to move. I've brought her inside to try and warm her up but I'm not sure what else to do or how to tell whether she is dying. Any help gratefully received!!

    J

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Jojo

  49. I rescued a tired bee. Put it in a box with roses and gave it sugar water. Next day took it into garden and it doesn’t seem to fly. Took it in fed it left it overnight. Bee still lively and drinking sugar water then sleeps but not wanting to leave? Should I keep it or put it in the garden?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Charlotte

    1. Day 3 rescued bumble bee still not flying but still alive and drinking sugar water a few times a day. Keeping it in a box with foliage. It sleeps inside a flower. Is there anything else I should do?

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Charlotte

  50. I have bubble bees going to and from under my decking just outside my door. This does not bother me but certain members of my family find it a bit scary.

    I was wondering how long the bees will stay?

    Please could you enlighten me thankyou

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Chick

  51. Two days ago I found a bee crawling around my septic tank cover. It has remained in the general area for the last 2 days and hasn't really moved much. There was a threat of a thunderstorm today so I decided to bring it into the house after reading some of the info on your website. I poked holes in the lid of a plastic container and put him inside with a couple of leaves that were in the area he had been staying. Almost as soon as I did that he started buzzing his wings frantically. Did I do the right thing bringing him in the house? He seems to be kind of upset. I don't want to release him now because it's going to rain quite heavily but I just wanted some guidance and what to do from this point. I do have photos of the bee if it would help you to identify it. Please advise what I should do next. Thank you 💜

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Cher

  52. Last night at around 8pm (U.K. time) I found a bee on our patio. I am big on helping and saving bees, so I gave him a drink of sugar water and left him on our garden table to rest. I went back out about an hour later to check he had gone and he was still there. I have him some water and even bought him inside in case he just needed to warm up a little. Now this bee has sat on me and rested, he’s crawled on me and let me hold him. I did some research and set up an open shoe box outside with some water and expected him to begone this morning. However he was still there. So I brought him back inside in case the temperature drop is why he didn’t fly away and he is still sat on me. He’ll move about for a bit and then rest and he hasn’t really seemed interested in a drink this morning. We have had the local council spray weed killer in our area of late, so wonder if that is the problem. We have a 4yr old son and are trying to teach him about being kind and helpful and he really wants us to help this bee. Any ideas on what else we can do or should we just put him outside and leave him to it? Many thanks

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Sarah

  53. I have a very wet bed on a bottle brush bush that is hardly moving, it is 10.30 am and more rain is due. What is the best thing to do?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Alison

  54. We have sloping a window on our kitchen ceiling, huge bees often get caught in the shallow dip under it and they can’t fly out. The stressed out buzzing noise is upsetting. Is there any kind of contraption or tool I can use to save them?? When they get caught in the dip (2cm wide) they end up dying 😢.

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Dina

  55. I had a bee sit in the same spot on my window all day today, it's a bit cold here at the moment, so as it was becoming late at night I was worried he was cold, so I warmed the glass from the other side with my hand. After a while of doing this he still hadn't moved, so I put him into a container with a tissue soaked in water to bring him into the warmth of the house for the night, as soon as I brought him in he became distressed and started flying about in the container. I didn't want him to feel scared so I brought him back outside (at this point it was 10pm at night), and left the lid open, and he immediately flew out. My question is, why was he sitting on the window all day and we'll into the night? He seemed well enough to fly...?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Christina

  56. Got a queen buff tailed bumble we rescued from exhaustion last night.

    She seems to be feeling better after a feed and a warm up, but she isn't buzzing off again.

    What should we do?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Kerrie

  57. I found a baby bee as it looks like on floor he’s quite tired and clinging onto a flower I’ve got for him I’ve given him sugar water but he didn’t really drink it he’s closed his wings but still moving his body when I give him a little lift up what else can I do does it take a while for him to get back strength?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Karina

  58. Your blog was a lifesaver, literally. I found two bees two days ago in my garden, and today after 48 hrs of snow and nights below zero, I found them today, no movement but alive (they climbed to a straw) so I brought them inside. I have cats so I needed to be very careful about them, and I was looking for a proper 'container' for them to spend the night. This article was everything I needed and more. Thank you so much for this info and your work!

    BTW, just for sharing, they looked dead after drinking sugar water and climbing on some greenery (they were really active walking, but clumsy and no flights), like you mentioned, but they were like that for 15 mins and suddenly, they started to move. So people, be patient with them.

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Chuck N.

  59. Thank you so much for your work. I have an issue with bees being stuck in my 3 season room. They may be nesting at the edge of my home and getting in under the floor boards in the room. Then they fly to the same extra warm corner far from the door. It's a screen in area. I've always been able to capture and release one at a time however this week, there are usually 3-6 at the same time. Any ideas?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Tammy

  60. I found a very almost dead bumble bee today the poor bee looked like it was fried up in the sun barely moving feet tucked under it, laying on my porch so i quickly brought it inside and made some honey water and it drank the drops i put on a lid it couldnt use its legs.. it looked almost dried up. After it drank for quite some time i put it on a napkin in a open container to rest in hopes that when i came back home it might still be alive. When i got home all its legs were working and he/she managed to get its winges back to normal and even the front legs were in use.... i was so proud to see the progress but right after i checked on him or her it passed away almost like he waited till i got home to show me his progress then passed away :'( my question is.. why did he wait till i got home to let go. He passed away within 5 minutes of me being back home i was gone for about 5 hours. It made me cry to know he held on till i got homr almost to say thank you and goodbye. Also ..In the future how often should i give a bee sugar water and do they sleep at night should i be leaving them alone and not checking on them constantly bugging them?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Audra Green

  61. Found a queen, gave her sugar water boxed her and warmed her on my hand but she won’t fly away. I think one of her wings is damaged and I don’t know what to do. Please help.

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Charlie-anne Mullineux

  62. We have a very large bee which we found on the pavement in a rain storm. It wasn't moving so we took it in and tried to give some sugar water. This was 5 hours ago and the bee will not touch the water. Kept in a tub and warm then after a while the bee keeps trying to climb out. So we put it outside in a sunny place but it then climbs back into our box and the process starts all over again. Not moving, warming it up then not taking any water. Repeated the process a few times now. Its heavy rain showers here constantly at the minute but don't want to keep the bee in the box too long with it not drinking. What is best to do. Thank you

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Paul

  63. What if you have a carpenter bee because my family dose not mind carpenter bees but what if one of the bees gets hurt or looses a wing. I don’t know how to help this bee but I red on Google that is likes to eat nectar, plants that grow pollen, and pollen. I don’t know how to make this bee feel like it is home. So I don’t know what the carpenter bee needs

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Erin

  64. What are we ever going to do when we can no longer purchase shoes that come in a box?!!! 😁

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Englishelley

  65. I had found a honey bee out in the rain just today but the clouds are covering up the sun

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Abby

  66. I'm in Michigan and found a bumble on the porch late yesterday. It was cold and miserable outside and she wasn't moving around so I picked her up, brought her in and fixed a little area for her. I put a drop of sugar water by her head, but she never really moved much and wasn't interested in the water. This morning, she'd died :( I feel so bad! I really wanted to help her. Thank you for the first aid instructions though. They will be helpful in the future because I do occasionally find one like that.

    Sad...

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to nightsmusic

  67. I have a pet bee. She was injured so I put her in a bug box for a few days. I made a bee house and put her in it. The next day, I was outside and she was hiding in a crack in the wood. She was not moving around (I poked her with a stick). I think that she is dead. What do I do?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Lily

  68. Just wanted to say thank you for this site. I was moving some of my plants indoors because it's going to be in the low forties and it's raining. I did not want my plants to die. In moving my blueberry bush a bumblebee fell onto the chair so I just picked it up and put it back on the bush and stuck in the corner. That's when I decided to Google And I came across your sight and thanks to you I saved the bee and now he is starting to move around.... I put the bush in my car and turned on the heat and I could seen him coming back to life : )... Now he is moving slowly in my bathroom in the blueberry bush

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Liz

  69. Hello again Elise!

    I just wanted to let you know. We took our little bee girl out on the porch about an hour ago (10:30 Michigan time) after sitting her shoebox in the sunlight inside the house and I offered a bit of fresh sugar water. Literally less than five minutes later she suddenly hovered up like a little helicopter and took off! She took a couple circles around the porch and was soon gone, looking like a typical little bumble bee. Complete 180 degree change from the wet tired bee I found yesterday. So you don’t have to worry about answering my post. Our little house guest is back where she belongs! Thank you so much for your informational website!

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Linz

  70. Hello Elise!

    I live in Michigan and found what looks like a bumble bee that had been caught in the rain yesterday morning (her wings seemed very wet and stuck together). It was drying outside when I found her but was overcast with no sunlight and the forecast called for more rain at night. So in watching her and reading your website I mixed up some sugar water and offered it to her. She seemed pretty interested and responsive to it. I’m not sure if she ate any as I didn’t see her tongue but I dipped a dandelion in it and offered her some drops as best I could. She moved her antennas and jaws to grab at it and also her legs but still couldn’t dry her wings naturally. I ultimately placed her in a shoebox with a bit of grass that I dried with a paper towel and a shallow lid with some sugar water. She managed to crawl up on the lid but this is where she stayed. We kept her in a spare room in our house overnight. In checking on her this morning she is still just on the lid of the shoebox not attempting to fly. I was planning on offering her some new sugar water and place the shoebox open on our porch where I found her when it’s warmer (the sun is out but it’s only in the 40s right now). Is there anything else I should be doing? I’d appreciate any advice.

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Linz

  71. Hi

    It’s cold today about 4 degrees and I’ve found what I think is a queen bee in the drive almost lifeless. It didn’t want water to start with so I brought it indoors. It’s now taken a big drink of sugar and water and is moving a bit more. Still looks like it’s struggling. It’s nearly 7 pm and very cold out.. which is such a change from Sunday when it was unusually warm. I’m watching the bee but she looks like she may take a while to recover . Do I put her outside??

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to N

  72. Found a frozen bumblebee in the morning. The little guy was able to thaw out but he seems to be unable to drink or not want to drink. It’s been 10hrs since I’ve found him and he seems to be the same. Very little movement and a bit wobbly. I don’t know what to do, can you please advise?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Kat

  73. Hi, I'm so sorry about the the fire and all the kisses you suffered. I hope things are shaping up better since the new year.

    I'm in nj and it's been getting into the 60s, and my hyacyinths are blooming. I cut a few last evening and put them in a vase, and didn't notice until late last night that there was a big bee on top of one. The temps had dropped to below freezing so I googled and found your site. I had a perfect shoebox with a hole in it, and I got some small branches from the bush where the flowers were and put them in the box. I tried to feed it the sugar water, but my hand was shaky, and then it crawled into the spoon, so I just closed the box for the night. My question is tomorrow and tomorrow night isn't going to get better weatherwise. I think the daytime high is 45°, so should I put the box out anyway, or wait until the next day which will be warmer, and try feeding it again?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Bernadette

  74. Amazing... I used info on here to recover a bee... Bee was stuck floating in a bird bath and I dumped it in a plant, but it looked all dirty and disastrous and weak... I made a shallow bath and washed all the dirt off and put it in a clean area... seemed sluggish... I tried cleaning it a bit, giving it honey and nothing much happened... I transferred it in a warm sunny spot, and when I saw its tounge gave it sugar water, and it spent more time cleaning itself up, looked wet.... I kept checking on it, and it was getting faster and more active... then after 10 minutes, I looked out the window and it took off like a rocket.

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Steven J

  75. Hello, I have had a bumble bee living in a shoe box (ventilated ) also inside my slipper , since Sunday night (now Tuesday night)

    It is still alive but no longer accepting and water/sugar .

    I can’t bare to put it outside as it’s so cold and when I do it curls up.

    Iam not sure if it’s trying to hibernate again inside my slipper or is it dying and Iam prolonging the misery? Please help as I just want to help this beautiful creature. X

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Laura silver

  76. I found a seemingly dead carpenter bee yesterday. It’s been 50’s day/40’s night. I brought her inside and gave her/him sugar water which she did drink, but since yesterday she doesn’t move unless I gently blow on her. She just doesn’t look good and does not move. she did fall forward into the sugar water. Should I try making a teeny wooden nest in old wood and allow her and nature to just, ah hem, bee?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to m

  77. Hi I fiund a Carpenter bee on its back so I put it in the sun and gave it sugar water. They usually dont come out until later in the summer. Im wondering should I keep her in thexouse in a container with sugar water ir try and put her in the tiny nest. They have been here for a few yrs. now. The weather is going to get colder again. Thank you.

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Kim

  78. Hi Elise,

    Your website has been very useful for me this morning as I found a large fuzzy bumble bee struggling on my patio this morning (I think she's a queen), she was on her back so I popped her on a small plate with some sugar water but her front leg didn't appear to be moving so she collapsed on her back a few times and got a bit covered in the sugary water unfortunately. After helping her stay up, removing the plate and popping her indoors for a bit with a smaller dish of sugar water ( placed her in the sun as it was cold outside )... she seemed to improve and move more. Eventually her wings buzzed but she was still struggling with her front leg I think. Maybe she was just lethargic still. It's now been 3 hours and she's made her way to my irises outside, she's still very slow. I am worried she has too much sticky sugary water all over her body. Any other tips to recommend for me to help her? I feel an urge to really look after her now :)

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Laura

  79. what is the difference between a worker bee and a big fuzzy bumble bee.

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to cookie cat

  80. Bit off topic, but queen wasps... If they come out of hibernation too soon (eg weren't aware that hibernating in a conservatory is a bad idea as you'll get a false "spring is here", signal, especially if there's a radiator too!), is it possible to re hibernate them /re induce diapause? Obviously care needed handling wasps, all though at this stage they have hardly any energy to do much they can attempt to fly + probably sting. But I fed her, it's a nice day, I put her outside, but in the knowledge that it will probably kill her, as I'm in Yorkshire in late Feb, + probably it will soon be tough weather again. So after 10 mins watching her womble around the lawn with a couple of very small flights, I've put her in a plastic tube with air holes + with a leaf to hang onto, on the shady side of the house. Trying to Google about wasps returns loads of pest control results! She may be about to starve to death either in or out of the tube, so I have nothing to lose with my experiment. Around mid March early April I will see if she survived + open the tube.

    Other than kill her (quick death rather than starvation!, even though the latter would be natural), is there something better I can do?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Rich

  81. Im a new beekeeper. We just got a hive yesterday and undid the hole today so they can learn where they live. Of course a weather-alert hit my phone a few hours into daytime. A big rainy cold front came in, blasting rain, wind.. I found about 8 or 10 cold wet bees at the base of the hive. I picked them up carefully with a stick and pushed them back into the reducer hole. Hopefully their bee friends will attend to them? That's all I could think of to do to save them. It'll be 37 tonight so I don't think theyd live on the ground overnite. Do you think this was the correct thing to do? I'm just learning. Thx

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Sarah

  82. With our recent hard freeze in Houston, Texas, all of my Mexican Heather and other bee favorites are dead. Now the sun is shining, and the bees are out.

    What can be done for emergency food source?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Cheren Goodwin

  83. Hi, yesterday I found a bee on the floor so I picked her up and gave her sugar water. She had a good drink and then I left her outside, tucked out of the wind so she could fly off. I checked on her later and by 8 at night she was still there. It was quite cold and I could see she was shivering her wings so I brought her in and put her in a little pot with some leaves and cut some big air holes in the top. This morning I’ve popped her back outside with a little cap of sugar water in the hopes that she will fly off. She’s definitely a lot more active but doesn’t seem to be going anywhere. Today is supposed to be quite a lot warmer so I’m hoping that it will get her moving, but what do I do if she again doesn’t fly off?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Shay

  84. I have a bee I saved from my pool yesterday it was almost dark and too cold for it to fly. I dried him and warmed him up, made him a little box and out some warm socks and some sugar water in a shallow dish. It has been raining all day today and its going to rain must of the day tomorrow and will be too cold. Should I just keep doing the same thing until it’s warm and sunny enough to releases him?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Melissa

  85. We have had a bumble bee with us over night after picking her up out of the snow. She is now crawling around and wants to get out of the box. Its minus 3 outside do you have any suggestions. Oh she also has part if her back leg missing.

    Thank you

    Vincent

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Vincent

  86. I found a struggling bumble bee this afternoon while walking my e elderly dogs.I picked it up and covered it gently with a dog blanket in my dog chariot that I use to rest one of my dogs when out as he has arthritis.

    I have it in a box with sugar water, kitchen roll and is on a warm radiator.It is reviving...but what can I do to keep it safe and well until a warm sunny day comes along?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Susan

  87. I keep rescuing bees from pool. They move quite a bit but then just end up going in circles and dying. Is there a way to avoid this?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to K172

  88. Hi

    Just found a large bumble bee. It look dead but I bought her in and she’s now warming up and moving.

    Now I do t know what to do as it’s -3 outside

    Please advise

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Fiona

  89. Hello 👋 so after work last night I found a very tired cold and wet bumblebee. I have fed with sugared water and kept her indoors in a shoe box but I think its to cold to let her go. As it is only just above freezing (I live in the south of england) my question is do I keep it for longer before releasing and if im keeping her longer do I have to provide her with anything else? Any advice would be very appreciated as I have never done this before. Thankyou in advance

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Just me

  90. I rescued a dozy cold queen bee last night and followed your advice.

    She is sleeping curled up on a flower today. Should I wake her or wait?

    How long do I keep her for and could she be hibernating?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Christine

  91. Hi - I have a natural bee hive in a large tulip poplar tree in my yard - about 35 ft up the trunk. The hive has been here for 5 years and seems healthy. It's cold here, about 45 degrees F high during the day. A stray bee has been at my screen door and I've brought it in at night. It's active at night, but once I put it out during the day it slows down. I fear it won't fly up to the hive, and wondering if I could take it to a local garden area that has several bee boxes at ground level. Would the other hive accept this stray bee? I don't want to put it in danger. Thanks, Kate

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to KC

  92. We have found a bumblebee in out house the other day its the 26 of December and the temperature has been very up and down in a very unseasonably way lately.

    We took this bee gave it some sugar water and we noticed that it has a damaged wing. Our son figures that it won't be able to make it back to where it needs to be without dying so we are going to keep it till its dies but we want the bee to be happy till it does.

    If you thi k that this is wrong please let us know, but if this seems OK we where wondering how to keep it.

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Jon

  93. I found a bee on the ground curled up with what looks like a white bubble on its butt? (Right Where the stinger is) I put it in the sun and it’s starting to move but it’s very twitchy - what can I do?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Cait

  94. I’ve been providing water for Bees every summer for about 3 years. This sounds strange but I can’t recall what I did when winter comes. I’m 71, it seems that my memory took a permanent vacation when I turned 70. This year I’m having trouble. The temps go down in the high 30’s and mid 40’s. The bees come early in the morning unless it’s too cold, or it’s raining. We haven’t had rain but 2 times all year. They are usually at the water no later than 10am. But it doesn’t take them long to fall in the saucer. I use plant saucers. They aren’t deep and are finished so it’s easy to keep clean. My problem is that on cold days they fall into the water very easily. I get them as soon as I see they are in the water. That water has been out all night, it’s very cold. I get them out and place them in the palm of my hand. My hands are always hot, I gently move them in my palm to help them wake up. They wake up and are happy the rest of the day. My problem is that at times bees that fall into the water in the afternoon don’t want to fly away before night fall. I’ve tried to keep them with me in the house during the cold night, but by morning they are dead. Tonight I have 10 bees that didn’t fly away by sunset. It’s going down to the 40’s tonight. I’d like to bring them inside, but I don’t want them to die! I love my bees very much and don’t want even one to die! I made a see through plastic container for my bees if I have to bring them in the house. It has lots of air holes. But in the morning they are dead. Please tell me what am I doing wrong? Should I leave the bees outside at night? Should I empty the water until next spring? I always check on the bees every couple of hours. It’s difficult because if I have a doctors appointment I sometimes can’t return to check on them for a few hours. Is it safe to use marbles? I read that, I did that with rocks when I was trying to have water available for butterflies. It got slimy very quickly. I didn’t want them die from bacteria growing so I just emptied it and didn’t do it again. The bees always go away just before it gets dark outside. Are they going to a hive nearby? If not, where do they go?

    Thank you so so much for your help. I’ve been looking everywhere for help. My wonderful husband found you for me. Thank you again, I’m very grateful.

    Patty

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Patty

  95. Hi I have found a large bumblebee outside on the patio soaking wet and cold (about 8degrees) I scooped it up and put it in a box and gave it some bee's honey ( I used to keep bees and have some spare). Don't know if that was a good thing to do or not.

    Anyway I am not sure it has dried out. I have made several attempts to let it go outside but it just curls up. (inside it is quite active). It was free to go but didn't. Now it is getting colder and darker so I have bought it in again. The problem is I think it will be cold for the next few days. Do I keep it in overnight and keep trying to let it go each day? If it doesn't how long can it survive in this (amazon) box?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Stu

  96. Hi I have had a bee arrive yesterday morning was out there in rain last night what can I do to help it

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Hev

  97. Hello! We found a freezing carpenter bee outside (it’s 40f). We brought him in, gave him sugar water and warmth. He perked up and was flying around the container so we released him near a bench we think his nest is in. He flew off but then came back to our front door a half hour later. We have him inside again and are wondering what to do next. Can you keep a carpenter bee over winter? I’m afraid he’s lost his nest somewhere and will freeze to death. Thank you!!

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Lea

    1. Perhaps the bee thought it was a good food sorce for it's hive and wants to come back? If so it isn't good and you probably shouldn't let the bee back in or it may be encoraged to try again to get more sugar water for the hive.

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Hebe Manon

  98. I found a bee in a glue trap, It was so awful watching it strugle. So I put some vegtible oil on it, but I think I drowned it. I finally got it out of the trap but it buttwas still moving, I tried to get it to wake up and fly or anything really, ut it stopped moving... Sadly it will not move for about 5 min now,... I feel really bad. 😥😓😩😭

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to beez

  99. It’s the start of a really cold snap and the onset of winter. There’s a poorly bee in my house. Can I keep it safe over winter? I’d usually offer sugar water and set it free but I don’t think it could survive winter!

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Elle

  100. Hi, we found a worker bee in the middle of the river while out on our boat. Got him on the boat to dry out and waited a while, but I think we was too tired to fly off. Brought him home to give some sugar water, but now I don’t know where to release him since it will be difficult to get him back to that area by car. Will he survive if released in our back yard?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Shelby

  101. I’ve found a bumble bee outside my back door early this morning, I think she may have been there all night, it’s November and winter, she is alive but only moving slightly- what should I do?

    Thank you

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Clare

  102. I have a large bee under a leaf in the garden. its been there for a few days .its alive, is there anything I can do to help it or is it dying

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Julie

  103. Hi! I found a honeybee on my car last night, it was supposed to get cold overnight(about 40F). I read that was too cold so I took the bee in and gave it sugar water. The outside temp today did not reach 50F. Tonight the temperature will reach 55F but that is only during the night and while it is raining, in the morning the temperature will drop to below 50F. Tuesday the high will be 45 and mostly sunny. Wednesday it will 53F and cloudy. Thursday will be 59F and rainy. Friday will be 57F and mostly cloudy.

    I am not sure when to release the bee as I do not know how long it will survive inside and which of those conditions would be the best to release it in. The bee has sugar water and I filled a bottle cap with compost, garden dirt, and water for it as well. I need help deciding when to release the bee and how to provide for it while inside.

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Kate

  104. Hey,

    Found a bumble bee yesterday. It’s freezing here and Bert is very slow and groggy. Given sugar solution. Today i put Bert outside but still nothing. Little flutter of wings. Please help. I’ve got quite attached

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Jo

  105. It is getting cold out. I found a bumblebee on my mum and mum is dying because it’s between 20-35 degs. Overnight and most days 40-50. The bee is sluggish. 2 others were there but they left. I took this single one inside 3 days ago, gave sugar water and live flowers in a butterfly habitat. I put him outside today cuz it was 60 but temps will drop tonight and over next week. He hasn’t moved off the mum. What should I do with him?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Nota

  106. The video that you have of the bees drinking in the red bowl. where it says: Shared with kind permission by reader Christine.

    May I have Christine's contact details or would you pass mine to her. I would like to see if she will give me permission to use her MP4 video.

    Lesley

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Lesley Woodfin

  107. Hi, I have found a western honey bee, he came in my house on wood for my wood stove he fell off thankfully and onto my floor I saw him crawling around and scooped him up. I have him in an open container I made some tunnels out of cardboard and he’s gone in. What am I to do with him if I put him back outside will he find his hive? It’s freezing out and we have snow now? Thanks so much

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Baby Sunflowers

  108. My girls for a bumble bee yesterday on a path. It was late afternoon on a cold, frosty day. We rescued the bee and took it home to warm up/ give sugar water. It perked up but didn't want to fly off. We have kept safe over night and now it is pouring rain (typical Scotland). It is moving around a little, giving odd buzz but doesn't seem that active to get going. Any advice?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Jacqui

  109. It's about 10-12'c out now. Found a large bee at the doorstep - taking in heat from the song sun. But it is sluggish and weak.. I've got it in a box, some flowers, sugar water, heat etc. Is it dying at this time of year? Any advice accepted.

    I saved a bee earlier in the summer, but it's cold out now.

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Kathy

  110. I found a bumbel bee queen mating she had only one wing i bought here inside and i gave her a daisy flower she drank and buried into the soil she is currently in hibernation when she has a few workers i am going to put her outside in a bumbel bee box is this okay?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Asim

  111. Hello. It is getting cooler by the day here in CT. Yesterday evening (10/24) I found what I believe is a honey bee. It was too cold to move so I gave it some sugar water and sat with it in my hand for a while but it did not fly away. I decided it was best to take it indoors overnight as it was getting dark outside. It warmed up and began flying inside the old fish tank I am keeping it in. But then when I brought it back outside (10/25) in the afternoon (the temperature is only 48 F) it tried flying and was unable to lift itself higher than an inch from the ground. It crawled back onto my hand and stopped moving. I figured it is still too cold outside for it so I took it back in and am not sure what to do now. The temperature is not supposed to get any warmer outside and there is rain in the forecast for the next few days. Please help!! Thank you

    -Sami

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Sami

  112. Hey. I found a honeybee in the crack of my car trunk today. I’m not sure if she was there from our house or my moms. She was hardly moving and seemed to be cold. I brought her inside and gave her a little sugar water And within a few minutes she was trying to fly. She doesn’t seem to be injured or dying. But it is chilly outside and fairly damp. Tomorrow is suppose to be the same way. She has a safe place for tonight but should I attempt to release her tomorrow seeing as how the weather isn’t the best and not knowing if her hive is here or in another town?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Kara J

  113. Today a bee was on me and it almost sting me what do I do?

    I was scared that the bee has already bit me!

    I hope I don't get an infection, but will I get an infection?!

    -Charley Maria Dela Rosa Badawi

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to charley

  114. We have found a bee this afternoon barely moving, we have bought it home given it some sugar water not sure it has taken any though as in a very poor state, it’s legs are moving very slightly at times and the head tucked right in, l have now put it in my hand which is quite warm, we also removed a fast moving mite! Any ideas please? In the past we have had bees that recover quickly, So not sure what to do as it’s October ! Many thanks in advance 🙏🌺

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Lisa S

  115. I have a bumblebee (or it could be a queen honey bee because my neighbors have bees) and it has been on the same flower for overnight (which was rainy and 40 degrees )and looks like it’s just hanging there. As we now approach another night she is still there but we are suppose to get a light frost tonight Should I try to bring it inside in a box? I’m afraid it could be a queen

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Deb

  116. Hello. Yesterday I took in 3 inactive bees that had been hanging onto a cut bouquet of sunchoke flowers on my back porch since the day before. So after some googling and finding your page I took a ventilated show box, added sugar water and a few of the sunchoke flowers (in water) and some soft paper. Once the bees were in they had fed on the sugar water they perked up so I went outside with the box. One bee flew away but not the other 2. I kept them overnight and now they still won't leave. What should I do?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to C

  117. We are in the middle of a storm. Rescued bee from wall, given it sugar water and its perked up, going to keep it overnight and hopefully release tomorrow. This storm is here for a while. We are in Cornwall UK

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Tee

  118. in Wisconsin its 4e degrees, wet m, and rainy. Found a best that wasn't moving. I brought it in, offered sugar eater, and warned him/her up. What do we do now?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Jodi

    1. Edit to correct 45 degrees

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Jodi

  119. Hi!

    I love Bees and am a little concerned looking for true answers. I’ve recently come across this “sleepy Bee” idea that says Bees sometimes sleep outside their “nest” in flowers. Are they truly sleeping ? I’m worried that it could be exhaustion of worse God forbid a pesticide issue. I’ve seen a few Bees recently asleep in what I think is a calendula flower. Yesterday and today in the early afternoon and morning. It’s been a bit cold late as well here on the east coast.

    Also I will note that this last summer I saw sooooooo many Bees out! I’ve never seen so many and yet made me feel food like perhaps humans being quarantined had allowed for done reset of nature and a much needed flourishing of Bee civilisation. I don’t know, just a thought. But I had a good feeling whereas with this sleepy Bee thing I feel bothered 😕

    Thanks for any insight 🙏 🐝 💓

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Shana

  120. Oct 3rd 2020. We have a dozy Bee in our conservatory. It's Autumn here in the UK and cold and pouring with rain outside. The Bee is crawling around slowly. We have supplied sugar and water for it but what else should we do ? Should we make make some sort of nest for it to crawl into? Our conservatory is getting a bit chilly now and we don't want to put the Bee outside where it's even colder.

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Geraldine Dodd

    1. I’m no expert but I read above that allowing the Bee to crawl on your skin may provide it with sine warmth fir recovery. Just thought I’d point that out so you can act quickly for the Bee 💓

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Shana

  121. I brought dahlias indoors from my plot. Next morning a honeybee was buzzing on the inside of my window. I tried to open the window to entice him out but couldn't find the key to unlock it, so decided to do same on my return about one & a half hours later. Sadly, it was dead on the windowsill of my other window. So sad. Feel like I have killed it. Why did it die? Regards jo d

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Jo

  122. I'm so relieved having read your post. The past few days here in Vancouver have been particularly rainy - very heavy at times - and I have been seeing so many thoroughly soaked bumblebees in my asters and dahlias both day and night. During the day I can pick 7-8 of them, bring them in to warm up and dry off and then when they're buzzing their wings I've been letting them fly outside when the rain has stopped.

    Last night we returned from dinner and I found at least 10 more bumblebees on the dahlias all soaking wet. I brought them all in, some still on the flowers they were on, keeping them in a shallow ice cream bucket with a soft mesh cloth (from a laundry bag used to wash delicate garments) on top. I've put them all in a quiet dark place.

    I was worried I was disturbing them and somehow messing with nature but I'm so glad to know after reading your post that this is ok to do. I will start offering sugar water. I have some hummingbird nectar I've made which I'll add more sugar to make it the correct ratio. Thank you for your information.

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Flavia C

  123. I know your site is all about wonderful furry little bumbles, but I have been so damaged by carpenter bees that I hate all bees that are not honey bees. I'm sure there may be a way to tell the difference, but any bumblybees I see, all seem to drill holes in my house.

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Tim

  124. i saved a drowning bee with my hands

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to kk

  125. A match of violence and blood, the blend of fun and also a slightly macabre feeling. Happy Wheels 2 https://happywheels2.club/ is a game where you choose lavish vehicles, from a bike to a wheelchair and send the through a comfy track where the clumsy driver will attempt to desperately escape mutilation, decapitation and departure, you may also detach the character from the car.

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    Leave a Reply to Hhappywheels2

  126. I came across a cold wet bee yesterday and followed the advice to house the bee overnight as we had an abrupt, cold start to our fall yesterday. Now that bee is warm and dry I see that she is injured, it looks like her front legs. Today’s a warmer day and I’ve made her a cozy spot on our deck next to our flowers, with some leaves, flower heads, fresh water and sugar water but I’m not feeling hopeful as she’s still there several hours later 😔. Any further advice?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Rhonda

  127. Hi I had a dish out all summer for the bees to use for water up until recently didn’t see much of them catching on ? Anyways 3 weeks ago I happily saw numerous bees using the dish and even some hornet types ! So to make a long story short I noticed that the glass rocks and sides of my water dish could use a cleaning? I was worried about them getting something from the moldy sides ? So I cleaned with vinegar and put fresh cold water in ? And now none of them are using it anymore? Were the bees leaving some type of scent to guide others to the bowl that I have now washed off or is it just coincidence?? Any help on this would be great!! Ty

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Nish

  128. A roofer told me that I had a bees nest. How can it be safely removed?

    I live in Lynn,MA 20 miles North of Boston.

    Thank you,

    Dr. J

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Dr J

  129. Found almost dead(?) large bee on garden table. I put sugar water and flower bud on leaf and tempted bee to eat/drink which it did. However it still seems sluggish. Another smaller bee has joined the larger one, this smaller one keeps flying away And coming back. Now, it has either mated with large bee or tried to either sting it or kill it. Not sure what to do, should I try and shoo little bee away or leave the pair alone??? Please advise, I have spent about 4 hours trying to make big bee strong enough to fly

    Regards xx

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Patsy

  130. I’ve been finding several lethargic bumble bees in a corner of the yard (and a few dead bees). It is unusual, we haven’t used pesticides (though who knows about neighbours), I’m wondering if it’s just because it’s a shady corner and it’s been a cooler summer (temps more low 20’s C than mid 20s as we’d normally see). Is it likely they’re Just cold or is there something else I should be looking for? I have started moving to a sunny location and feeding them, but it’s usually unnecessary, especially for so many bees this year. We have so many flowers in bloom that I have difficulty believing they’re going hungry.

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Beth

  131. So my neighbor has a bee box I care take her home while she is at work the bees were fine yesterday but my other neighbor called me saying his backyard is swarming. I went over there and her box is swarming and the bees are dropping out of the box in big blotches and swarming. It is a cool morning what is going on?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Darleen

  132. I was just driving out old, dry soil in my trough to put yes I compost in and I've come across mining bees in little kids in the soil. I guess they're baby bees, one doesn't even have fully formed wings! What should I do? I feel terrible. Should I leave it or can I do anything to help reverse the damage I've caused?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Summer

  133. Hi,

    Late this evening it turned cool and while out with a lamp, checking my flowers for nasties, I found a struggling bee..

    I tried to give it sugar water on a teaspoon, but it fell to the floor. I re-approached with the teaspoon and the bee started drinking.

    After the drink, the bee became more animated, but was struggling to fly - I assume it was because of the cold.

    I put the bee in a well ventilated box for the night, in the house and intend to release the bee tomorrow.

    I'm hoping the bee will be ok and that I can get the bee flying as bees are in trouble and we need to save all we can.

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Paul

  134. We had a series of storms over the weekend. While I was on my deck securing some furniture down, I found a carpenter bee. I brought her inside and saw that her wings had been torn off and two of her legs on her left side no longer function. I won't be able to release her back into the wild, as there is no way she will survive. But I'm happy to care for her.

    I just need some help in knowing what I can do. Whenever I try to research her needs as a carpenter bee, all I get are "pest control" sights or how to get rid of them - which is not something I want to do.

    I try to bring her a variety of flowers every day but I don't know what kind she needs - all I know is she needs shallow open-faced flowers because her mouthparts are shorter than honey bees.

    I often let her curl up in my hand (her favourite place is usually between my fingers, where she likes to rest or groom herself) I've had her for 5 days now. She fed on the 3 day, (and pooped twice) but I'm worried about her still. She doesn't take sugar water often, and most the time she will crawl over the flowers or just curl up on them.

    I'm worried about the long term, because I know she needs the nutrients from flower nectar. I'm just at a bit of a loss, so any help and advice you can offer will be deeply appriciated.

    She's a fighter, extremely gentle, and I've grown very fond of her.

    Sincerely,

    Mia

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Mia

  135. I lifted up a sedum plant outside and apart from the usual woodlice there was a large black furry insect with several legs lying on its back it flipped over to reveal it was a large bee I put the sedum plant back on top of it as I didn't know what else to do was there anything else I could have done?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Carla

  136. I lifted up a sedum plant outside and apart from the usual woodlice there was a large black furry insect with several legs lying on its back it flipped over to reveal it was a large bee I put the sedum plant back on top of it as I didn't know what else to do was there anything else I could have done?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Carla

  137. What to I do if I found a bumblebee stuck in sweetened milk?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Dunja

  138. I have rescued a bee from paddling pool in the garden. She was walking as I left her in the sun on some flowers now she is barely moving and semi curled up in a ball, I have placed into a box with some leaves flowers but looks like she isn’t going to make it. I’m so sad please help do they sleep should she be barely moving ? Offered sugar water but she dragged herself through the few drops I put out now worried I’ve caused her to be sticky and made it worse 😫 please help

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Annabelle

  139. We have now three bumble bees that were on our back porch all within three days who have black sticky stuff all over them causing them not to be able to fly. Two have lived the last two nights even in this condition. I have tried everything I can think of to help them. They have been staying in our garden boxes.

    Please help!

    I still cannot determines the source from which is causing this! It must be near as they are dropping on my back porch.

    Any ideas on how to clean them?!

    Best,

    Gabrielle

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Gabrielle

  140. I’m trying to save a bumble bee because it’s weak. It’s tongue is sticking out and will not go in. I’ve put him/her into a box with some foliage. Please can you give me some advice? Why won’t it’s tongue go back in?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Louise

  141. Not really a question. I'm so angry with myself. I am scared of bees, but when I saw one drowning in my pond I scooped it out with a spade. It was alive, so I left it in the sun to dry. Gradually its wings seemed to fix and I could see the bee was now completely dry. I even gave it some sugar water, which it declined.

    Come night time I didn't know what to do, there was no way I could have it in my house. So I left it, but still checked on it. It even buzzed, but still wouldn't fly away.

    Later in the evening I heard it start raining, without hesitation I ran outside to get the bee under some shelter so that it didn't get wet again before being strong enough to fly off. To my dismay it was dead, ants had gotten it. I never even considered that ants would appear and kill the poor thing. I saved it's life, and then my fear of bees prevented me from taking it indoors and cost it's life. I just felt the urge to try and help it despite my fear of them. Now I'm sad, I feel like I failed it :( :( :( :(

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Chaz

  142. I found a bumble bee in my garden 2 days ago on the floor, I offered it some sugar water as it had been there a couple of hours. It was still there later on in the day so I moved it onto a Passion flower. It is now morning day 3 and it is still on the Passion flower, he/she is alive, I offered more sugar water but the bee does not seem to be drinking it. What should I do next? The weather is meant to turn for the worse.

    Thank you

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Laine

  143. Hi.

    I rescued what seems to be a bumble bee from my paddling pool. It climbed onto the lead fine and I put it in a flower in the sun thinking it would dry off. It’s head and centre body part appeared to dry off but the back end still looks sleek as if wet. It was moving a bit so I wasn’t too worried.

    Approx 1 hour later the bee was still there. It wasn’t moving and it was only when I gently blew on it that I could see it was still alive. The sun had set so I took it into my garage and put it onto a saucer with a cap containing some sugar water close to it. Two hours later it had crawled out of the saucer and was lying on its side.

    I’ve now brought it inside where it is slightly water. It’s in a Tupperware container with pierced cling film over the top (I have very young kids so Don’t want it loose in the house if it gets better).

    I now have a petal with a drop of sugar water instead of a lid which I have placed inside the box. Is there anything else I can do? I fear the outcome is not favourable for this little bee :(

    Thank you.

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Daniele

  144. My partner found two bees in our paddling pool yesterday, he brought them both in and I put them on some tissue where they both began to clean/dry themselves off. As it was already late in the evening and they were in no rush to leave, I made them each a box to stay in over night as it was also cold and raining. I tried them both with the sugar water solution which neither wanted and put them in their ventilated boxes. Come the morning the smaller, less colourful one of the two had died, the other had perked up. I gave him some more sugar water solution which he drank, I also gave him some of my lavender which he foraged for pollen. It is only 13 degrees celsius here today, and it doesn't plan on warming up to about 22 degrees until 2 days time. I've been keeping him in the downstairs toilet which is full of natural light, cool and next to the back door. When I check in on him he's very active and he must have flown at some point too as he was out of his box however when I take him to the opened backdoor or the garden he remains still and doesn't attempt to fly. So I'll bring him in and check on him 30 mins later and he's moved around again. Is it just too cold for him outside? The fact that he must have flown at some point seems promising as he definitely couldn't have crawled from where I'd put him on a high shelf to the floor. I live in England and the weather is cold and damp at the moment, and as usual you can't rely on the weather forecast.

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Cat

  145. I saved a bee and it flew so it survied

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Tom

  146. I have a covered garden house. The sides and front and back are opened this time of year. Most days no problems for the bees to come and go. Occasionally they forget how they came in anD struggle to find a way out. They want to go higher! This morning I had five doing this. I rescued all of them. What can I hang like a small bee bubbler with sugar water near the opening for them to say, “heh this way out!”?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Nina Sharon Goinsd

  147. We live deep in the countryside in South Wales and since the weather started to get warm early, the bumble bee queens all started to some out and within 6 weeks we had hundreds of bees busy collecting pollen and nectar from the trees and flowers. But.... in early June we had very low temperatures, almost a frost, and now we have not seen a bee for weeks. Do you think the cold temperatures may have killed off all the grubs and worker bees? There are still plenty of flowers for them and they are usually all over the clover that is flowering now, but not a single bee!

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Sparky

  148. Hi, I saved a honey bee from a bird bath and watched while it dried itself and cleaned itself in the sun, then just before it flew away it looked like it excreted or spewed water. What was the bee doing?

    Thanks

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Anna

  149. Hi,

    I found a bee that wasn’t moving

    I offered sugar water - didn’t take it

    I took it and placed it in my plant pot (thinking it would pass away but amongst the flowers)

    The next day the bee was still there and I went to move it... it moved a little.

    I offered sugar water again - couldn’t see it’s tongue out.

    Left for the day - still the same

    I now keep it in at home with me at night to avoid it getting wet etc

    But I can’t actively see it drinking the water or getting anymore movement... but it is still alive (day 3) what should I do? Xx

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Victoria

  150. Hello, I found a bee, which I think is a Tree Bee, a week ago and she has part of her wing missing so can't fly. I out her on a flowering plant and kept checking on her. She stayed there all day so in the evening I covered the plant with large ivy leaves and left her.... She was still there in the morning. I had to go away at the weekend and it was due to be stormy so had to accept she may not survive or be there 3 days later... Well she wasn't on the plant when I returned but came wandering over the lawn! She's still here over a week later and being fed on a diet of flowers that she drinks from and the odd bit of strawberry jam ( treat)! She stays on the plant all day and I cover her up when I go to bed... She's currently drying out in a Bug Box with leaves etc that we had from years ago since it's rained all night... Can't believe she's still here 😍 I'm going away again this weekend but would it be ok to take her to another garden for a spell or should I leave her in my garden alone!? She's now called Bee-Yonce... Am I getting too attached!?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Mother Ter-Bees-a

  151. Rescued a bee from a pool. Offered some sugar water with zero interest, It has ‘t moved in over an hour anything else

    I can do to help it?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Kyle

  152. My sister found a bee in our pool and took it inside and it kept falling over then we took the bee up stares and we looked after it but it might die 😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Amy

    1. Don't worry, your bee is probably wet, or it's wings are. Just let it dry off, and hope it will be okay.

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Lisa

  153. What happens if I can’t revive my bee? I had already revived Mr. Buzzy Bee 🐝 but he seems to not be being revived a second time. I am worried and want a solution quick! It seems like he got attacked by hornets and I have been feeding him sugar water, like you said. I have put him outside, and am hoping he can live a little longer. I had just revived him at 12:00 pm and now it’s 7:30, I am sad and want him to live more. I think his whole colony was attacked so I want to take good care of him! Is there a solution to this, because I just tried his sugar water again, and still, no sign of hope. 😢😢😢🐝🐝🐝

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Mari

    1. I buried him... 😢😭😭😖

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Mari

      1. I am so sorry your bee died R.I.P to your bee 😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭

        Reply

        Leave a Reply to Livvie

      2. I am so sorry your bed died R.I.I to your bee 😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭

        Reply

        Leave a Reply to Livvie

        1. I am so sad t all the bees that died R.I.P 😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭

          Reply

          Leave a Reply to Livvie

        2. I am so sad t all the bees that died R.I.P 😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭

          Reply

          Leave a Reply to Livvie

  154. How to tell a male bee from a female bee and I saved a bee from some water

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Nikki

    1. Bees are male and female bees are both gender

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Amelia

  155. I found a bumblebee clinging onto my washing as I was bringing it in, it wouldnt fly off so I made it some sugar water, it crawled round for a few minutes and then its bottom started pulsating (the only way I can describe it!) Then it did what looked like a wee, the same colour as the sugar water, then it moved to some more sugar water I'd put in a different spot and then quickly flew off, at no point did I see it drinking, so I was wondering what it could have been doing? Strange question I know I'm hoping you have an answer as it's really intrigued me!

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Stephanie

    1. Hey! I had the kind of same problem. Mine didn’t fly off tho. But it didn’t drink either. It was weird!

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Mari

  156. Took in a sleepy tree bee overnight and its had some sugar water this morning. Beautiful warm sunny day so have taken outside but it still doesn't seem able to get strength to fly. Quite lively and rubbing back legs and running around box stretching wings but no flight. Any ideas?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Pat

  157. Hello

    I found a bumblebee lying on the floor whist walking to the shop I gave her some sugary water and she drank some but she is still sitting on my flower from last night what do I need to do to help her

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Hanna

  158. Today (mid-June), I came across a carpenter bee freaking out on the sidewalk: rolling around, flailing its wings but not flying. Seemed to be aggressively grooming? I tried to coerce it onto a leaf to bring it to a safer, grassy area, but it didn’t seem to have much control over itself. I couldn’t see any mites, and it appeared to have all its limbs. What was wrong? How could I have helped?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Kristina

  159. what if the bee is to hot i'm in texas and its 92 degrees F

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to josiah

  160. I just wanna share my story so I’m 9 there was a bee at my grandmas house the bee was in the birdbath so I decided to save it before it died I grabbed a leaf from the ground and I tried to pick the bee up wit it for about 20minuits and then I got it so I started walking with it around my grandmas back yard and then when I went next to are shed it flew away and didn’t come back

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Bean

  161. there is some sort of yellow sticky string coming out of the side of this cold and wet bee that i found. it is in a box right now with honey and sugar water. do you know what it could be?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to charlotte

  162. I live in Ohio. I have medium sized ground bees with more than one hole in my front flower garden. I trim these bushes once or twice year. The bees ground holes are right under the bush. They are fuzzy, light yellow, fat like a bumblebee but have black butts. Their colors are not real vivid. I’m afraid to trim the bushes and plant in the garden. Are these bumblebees? I do have a video of them. I accidentally put a tarp over their hole and that’s when I saw like 4 or 5 flying around. I trimmed 95% of the bushes without a sting or knowing they were there.

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Shelly

  163. Having Just found a drowning bee on a rainy wet day, in a tub of water. I have brought her in and tried to encourage a little sugar water, but I accidentally dropped a huge droplet onto the bees back. Now the bee is struggling as it dries it's all sticky. I feel so sad I have been so careless and really just tried to help her! She is walking around on our indoor strawberry plant and vibrating her wings. How can I help her?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Georgie

  164. I gave a bee sugary water roughly 2-3 days ago it was a very hot day so after it was trying to fly but can’t, it’s wings were going but nothing, I assumed it was tired so removed from patio and placed on the lawn as cooler, I’ve just been mowing the lawn and luckily spotted it, I placed on my hand and put in the air it tried to fly off end of my hand but fell back into the grass. I’ve moved it further out the way but don’t know what else I can do :( can you please help

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to teresa redman

  165. i found a bee on my windowcill and was there for a few hours in the morning. i decided to feed it some honey, and so it ate. the rain was spitting and the bees wings were with small droplets. i decided to make little shelter outside using a small box and some tissues inside. i put it outside as i was afriad it might get lost in the house and so it walked into the shelter rested for abot 40mins and the was moving about then left the box. its not a question but i wanted to share my story with you.

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to maddie

  166. I saved a bee out of my paddling pool. It was crawling around but now it's stopped and is breathing but barely moving and has curled up. I've given him sugar water and now bought him inside as the sun has gone in. Do you think it's too late for him?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Jo

  167. We found a bee last night that wasn't moving. We gave it some sugar water but still didn't fly. It survived the night and tried some more sugar water but it doesn't seem interested in this. We've warmed it up and keeps buzzing it's wings but doesn't fly away. It's also very wobbly. Is there anything else w3 can do?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Amy

  168. I rescued a bumblebee from my paddling pool last night.I fed it some sugar water but it wasn’t very keen so I put some on the path for it.I have only found your page this morning so I didn’t know to put it in a ventilated box overnight.I assumed it would have flew off overnight but it hasn’t.It is only moving a few steps at a time.It has been buzzing and flapping its wings but it rolls over sometimes and can’t get back up without help.I don’t want to keep trying if he is dying and I’m just prolonging things.What is the kindest thing to do?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Vikki

  169. Found her walking around and put her on some flowers, she took the pollen and is still active but she won’t fly away. She doesn’t look injured in anyway, do you know what might be up?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Tevis

    1. She might want to stay with you or just waiting for the right moment to fly away

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Bean

  170. I found a bumblebee on my balcony that was not moving so I took it inside and tried to give it suger water but it won't drink anything, I've had the bee for 5 hours now and it still won't drink, it's also not moving, I actually thought it was dead until I saw its leg move slightly. The weather here has drastically changed from lovely and warm to cold and rainy with high winds and its 8pm now so I'll keep her over night in a shoe box but I am concerned she's not drinking or moving much.

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Chloe

  171. Hi we have this little bee which has sat in our porch for 2 days. Today I fed her sugard water but she still she has stayed. She doesn’t try and fly and she seems very weak. All she does is lift her legs up and she has something yellow on each side of her leg. Don’t know what to do with her.

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Ellie

  172. I found a bee yesterday on our lawn, too tired to fly so I put it up on a bird table with some nectar and out it under our porch so it was as much out of the wind as possible as it also started raining. However this morning it still hasn't moved, but when I gently blow on it, it does, so I know it's still alive... from the pics above, it looks like the middle bumble bee queen. I have a "minibeast house" which I could pop it in tonight if it is still there, will keep it warm and sheltered even more with some nectar etc if you think that will be okay and release tomorrow, but is there anything else I can do to help it today? I hope this all makes sense, thank you

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Lucy

  173. I have a poorly bee. I found him on my door step 48 -ish hours ago. He’s struggling to walk and is spending most of his time lying on his back kicking his legs. I have managed to get him to drink a little sugar water but he’s showing no improvement. We’re moving into day three of him struggling and I don’t know what to do.

    He buzzed on day 2 a little with his bottom and I don’t know whether maybe ending his struggle may be best.

    He has a lovely house in a box with access to food and water.

    He’s still living and kicking but his legs won’t work.

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Charlotte

  174. I have a poorly bee. I found him on my door step 48 -ish hours ago. He’s struggling to walk and is spending most of his time lying on his back kicking his legs. I have managed to get him to drink a little sugar water but he’s showing no improvement. We’re moving into day three of him struggling and I don’t know what to do.

    He buzzed on day 2 a little with his bottom and I don’t know whether maybe ending his struggle may be best.

    He has a lovely house in a box with access to food and water.

    He’s still living and kicking but his legs won’t work.

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Charlotte

  175. I have a bee in the garden that id totally disorietstsd. It can't walk normal and rolling around. Is there anything I can do to help?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Sarah

  176. I found a bee on the floor and brought it home. It won’t take any sugar water and falls on its back when it tries to move. One of its legs is curled under and the next one is sticking up. It can’t seem to sit straight. What should I do?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Hannah

  177. Today in hot weather I found a bee on the path. It was not really moving. I picked it up and brought it back to my garden and gave it come sugared water which it drank. Unfortunately my bee fell into the sugary water and I was cornered that it’s wings had become sticky. I dropped some water onto the bee and I have left it in a shoebox with greenery tonight. Are there any other tips you can give me please? My bee is very sluggish and want to do everything I can to help it on it’s way?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Charlotte

  178. Hi, I found a bumble bee queen on the garden floor yesterday afternoon. She looked well but wasnt flying, just buzzing on the floor. I offered sugar water but she didn't drink. I read that buzzing meant that she is cold so i brought her in the house and laid her on a piece of kitchen roll with sugar water close by. She is still there barely moving and not trying to fly. Her probosis is out and she only moves her abdomen and head occasionally. I think she is dying. I attempted wetting her prognosis with sugar water with a toothpick and that seems to have made her move a bit more afterwards. I dont know if there is anything else I can do for her, but I thought you might. Thanks

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Maria

  179. Hi, I found a bumble bee queen on the garden floor yesterday afternoon. She looked well but wasnt flying, just buzzing on the floor. I offered sugar water but she didn't drink. I read that buzzing meant that she is cold so i brought her in the house and laid her on a piece of kitchen roll with sugar water close by. She is still there barely moving and not trying to fly. Her probosis is out and she only moves her abdomen and head occasionally. I think she is dying. I attempted wetting her prognosis with sugar water with a toothpick and that seems to have made her move a bit more afterwards. I dont know if there is anything else I can do for her, but I thought you might. Thanks

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Maria

  180. A bee fell in my pool and there is no sun outside because it is a stormy day and I don't have sugar water because I can't make it I have no sugar what do I do

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Hannah

  181. Can bees die if they only have 3 legs to walk on

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Sharon

  182. I’ve had at least three huge fuzzy bees , likely spring queens, crawling around in my garage. Very sluggish weak ...first one died after many hours, I tried to give sugar water. Second one I put in the sun and it flew away before I could could get water to it which is great . third one is struggling, won’t take sugar water,it’s going to be night soon how can I help her ....She is still moving a tiny bit but starting to curl up like the first one.

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Catherine

  183. I found a bumblebee on the water I took it out straight away ,I put her on the sunlight to dry but don’t know if she is dead or not I gave her a water sugar solution too any help would be great thanks.

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Patricia

  184. Hi a honey bee found his way into our house yesterday so I let him crawl onto my hand and placed him onto a nearby cosmos outside, an hour or so later I went outside and he was still there. Barely moving, I mixed some sugar water and plopped a small drop on a petal he had a small drink and proceeded to crawl around and had a little wash, as the sun started to fade he stopped moving around so I took the potted flower Indoors. He then proceeded to crawl out of the pot along the side and into the window and got settled in a potted plant.burrowed into the dirt his head first and his bum sticking out. He is still there this morning. I have popped the plant outside with him in incase he needs some warmth..will he survive? Is it possible he has died, I feel I did all I could for him. Is it normal for bees to burrow into soil? Many thanks x

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Honeybee1

  185. Some bees that I rescue from my pool turn back to the pool and jump back in. One bee I rescued 8 times and kept doing it. If I can get them when they are motor boating, they fly away. We have bee hives. We keep a rag tied on the steps so they can get water safely. Thanks

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Pk

  186. Hi,,

    I have keep a queen been safe (after finding her in a pool) overnight.

    I was going to release her the next day but it is quite windy.

    I'm just wondering if she'll be able to fly in the wind?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Leann

  187. I rescued a bee lastnite from drowning I brought it inside and gave it some sugar water. Due to the weather I decided to keep it in over night. When I woke this morning the bee is still sluggish and doesn't want any water any idea what to do. Thanks

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Rachel parker

  188. I have found what looks like a queen bee, hanging onto the side of a net paddling pool.

    I rescued her and placed her onto my blossom tree but she was hardly moving and it is extremely windy. I made the decision to take hey in side but I picked some blossom, because she was enjoying munching on them, and placed her in a shoe box. I've put her into my boys play house, so she doesn't get confused by the heat in my house.

    I'm just wondering if she'll be OK with the flowers until morning?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Lenne

  189. If you make a bee mad is there a way to make it happy again. Also if you are scared of a bumble bee do you have any tips for me???

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to angelica young

  190. We found a honeybee that could not fly and had a damaged leg. We warmed the bee up and gave him some sugar water but he keeps doing well and then not so well. He is not moving too much right now, and I'm not sure if he will fly again. What should I do?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Lorin

  191. We rescued a damaged male carpenter bee in early March, and have had him in an aquarium with sugar water (and kitted it out) ever since. He is really clumsy. When we took the aquarium into the sunshine with the top off, he hid, then was upset when we took him in late in the day. What should we do?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Lori

  192. I just pulled the grill cover off a honey bee hive that was underneath , a downpour happened soon after. Will they drown? Will they leave on their own or do I need to find a company to relocate them?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Lindsay

  193. I found a male carpenter bee earlier today tried to give him surger water no change then regular water hes stumbling around and wont pull his tongue in his mouth what should i do

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to David

  194. Hi there,

    Found a bumblebee laying on the floor in my back garden, gave it some sugar water and it seemed more energised, but it did not fly away, I left it for a few hours and came back, it was still on the floor, worried my neighbour might come out and step on it I picked the bee up with a small twig which it held onto, to under a bush and left it some sugar water, it has been there for three days, and is still moving but seems sluggish, wings seem intact and nothing seems injured, I read that it might be to cold for it to take off so I have brought it inside and have made a wee box up for it, so it can stay warm and have some sugar water to pick it up, but it’s seeming not very active, I’m a bit worried and want to know if there is anything else I can do, thank you :)

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Trisha

  195. Hi guys. I found a Bumbleebee yesterday morning drowning in my pool. I've taken her ( assuming it's a female) out and have had her kept warm since yesterday with sugar water. Shes very mobile but just dosent seem to want to fly off. I have no idea what to do with her at this point. Xx

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Carly

  196. I found a female carpenter bee on the ground her one wing is extremely short she cant fly, we put her on top of our BlackBerry bush so that she can get nectar, is there anything we can do to help her? She is very docile and hasn't hurt us.

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Sarah

  197. How do you help a bee stuck inside you’re home to find a way out? I have a struggling bee wasting all it’s energy by a second story window trying to get out with an open door right underneath it one story down.

    :(

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Dearwyn

  198. Found bumblebee on floor of wet porch in 40 degree rainy day . Unresponsive at first

    Made sugarwater drink

    Bee refused it even after I brought it inside and it warmed up

    It's supposed to freeze tonight and tomorrow but Wed should be in the 50's so I'm planning to keep it inside til then

    BUT : How do I get it to drink - It tries to get AWAY from the teaspoon of sugarwater!!!

    Thank you so much for any help!

    eileen

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to eileen

  199. I’m trying to save a bee I found on its back and seemed to be crunching it’s legs up, I’ve tried sugar water, I could see him drinking it but now he seems like he’s dying and not moving

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Danica

  200. Hi,

    I live in the UK and me and my daughter were out on the trampoline on weds afternoon after it had rained and we found a very small bee struggling to fly so we picked her up with a leaf and placed her in one of our flower pots she stumbled to hide under a leaf, she buried her bottom into the soil and stayed there. We came out the next evening to check on her and it had rained heavy so we placed the ot under a chair and she hadnt moved she was in the ssamespot that we left her in and we tried offering sugar water butshes not interested. Im unsure what else i can do to help her shes very small so am also unsure what kind of bee she is too. Do we just let nature take its course ad see if shes ok by herself. would love any advice my daughter just loves bees and would also like to help her

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Amiee

  201. I found a big bumblebee about 10mins ago. It is 6pm right now so the sun is going to set in about 1hr or so and the temp is 47 Fahrenheit right now and will drop to the kid 30’s Fahrenheit during the night. It is very early spring here so there aren’t any flowers around yet and I’m not sure what to do with this bee. For now it is inside a small critter container w a soda cap full of sugar water 50/50. Is that all she needs for overnight? And how do I know when I should release her back into the wild. And how do I know if she is a queen bumblebee or not? The only thing I know for sure is that she is a bumblebee. Thanks in advance for your response!

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Stef

  202. Hello . I've just rescued a giant queen bee that was drowning. My question is after she had drink and dry off she lent on her side lifting her side legs waving at me then she took off,flew in circles around me about 6 times then flew into the blossom tree. What was the waving? Was she warning me not to get closer or thanking me for saving her? It took her a good hour to fully dry (looking like a drowned rat) so I don't think she was being aggressive with this leg lifting as I'd fed her sugar water etc etc. It just blew me away like she was saying thank you to me. Thanks I enjoy your bee page.kind regards steve

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Steve

  203. I’ve had a bumble bee injured for the past week in my garden. Part of one of its wings is missing. I’ve been putting sugary water and wild flowers where it seems to stay, but it’s going to rain for the following week. Will it survive or should I take it indoors?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Kelly

  204. Hello!

    I found a grounded bumble bee yesterday, and I brought it inside to warm up a bit and give it sugar water. It warmed up, but I did not see it drink anything. I left her inside and left a drop of sugar water close to her, but she did not drink any, but she moved slightly. I then left her in the house because I figured she would pass away. When I woke up today I found her still alive, and still she hadn’t taken any sugar water. It’s been 24hours and she is still alive and still hasn’t taken any water. I’m surprised and wondering if this is normal?

    Thank you :)

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Em

  205. Hey :)

    I spotted a large bumble bee that wasn’t really moving in my garden and I gave the bee some sugar water, I’m not too sure if it really had any of the sugary water solution and stayed pretty much still the whole time, sometimes I would move the leave under the bee to see if the bee was still alive and it was, I put it under a tree for some shelter and the night was quite rainy And had been quite bad weather for a while now. The next day I go and check on the bee and it was very still but still alive, I came on here to see if there was anything else I could do so I put the bee in a container in my shed to give it a bit of warmth. Still not much movement, is there anything else I can do to help the bee? (Also thank you this page was a big help!)

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Ari

  206. Hello

    Sorry to bother you at this busy time.

    I swept my drive up on tuesday and uncovered a queen buff tailed bumble bee amongst the loose leaves. She was crawling about and seemed active so I put her on some flowers in the sun that she tucked into. Many hours later she was still there and crawling around and not able to fly.

    There is no wing damage I can see and she flits her wings like she wants to take off but doesn't. Tuesday evening she was not on the flowers I put her on so thought she had flown off.

    Wednesday morning I found her walking out from under the planter of the flowers I put her on.

    Both days I offered sugar water which she did not want.

    I spent most of wednesday and thursday carrying her around the garden taking her to different flowers. I brought the loose leaves from the front to re-cover her over. Wednesday night she headed back under the planter and emerged Thursday morning about 10:30am. Last night she was on the flowers on top of the planter I placed her on but holding on to them and still, so i put her under the planter and she headed into the loose leaves. This morning she wandered out again at 10:30am so I put her back onto some flowers in full sun. It is windy today currently 12 degrees.

    I really cant see any physical damage to her wings. She rears up and flits them after indulging in the flowers but she cant seem to move them quick enough to get flight.

    I am not sure if I should keep doing what I am or if there is any more I can do? She does pump her body a lot when I put her in the sun like she is trying to warm up. Should I try and warm her up further? I'm also worried we dont have that many flowers in our garden at the moment. My neighbour has a lot on his front lawn and I am tempted to take her to those but then I wont be able to keep an eye on her if she wanders off. Should I keep returning her to under the planter?

    Is there any more I can do?

    Will she re hibernate if it's too cool for her?

    Do you have any advice as to why she isn't flying?

    I am on day 4 of carrying her around the garden and putting her under the planter at night. I dont want to just leave her as she will likely die. Which I do not want to happen especially as she is a queen. She really perks up after flowers but not enough to fly.

    Every company/charity/ beekeeper I have emailed havent emailed back.

    Many thanks

    Lauren

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Lauren

    1. Hi...I am in more or less the same situation as you. If I find an answer I will pass it on to you :)

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Caroline

  207. Roselle

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to BarryJed

  208. Found a bumble bee near death on my urban porch. I’ve been nursing it back to health and want to know if I can release it about a mile away where there are plants/flowers as there are very few plants near my place.

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Jason

  209. Hi given the bumble bee some sugar water but it fell upside down and got some water on it’s wings tried to put a little pure water on them and it’s wings are now moving think it may just be tired

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Paula

  210. Hi again she's doing better today😀😀😀😀😀😀😀😀😀😀😀 😀 😀

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to GA

  211. I have a giant bee on my windowsill for a second day. Most probably the queen bumble bee (I am not an expert to judge)

    Yesterday I left a bit of water next to her and found her dead, today I moved her a bit and she was moving her legs. I found your site and as I have no sugar at home, I offered her a bit of apple slice, well I put her on this slice and watched how she moved and looked almost healthy, but then she crawled of the slice and lies as if she's dead again next to an apple slice and a small jar top with a water and apple. What's wrong? What can I do to help the creature?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to olga

  212. Hi!!! We have found a bee outside on a plant and it was cold outside so we thought it was sun bathing but it was still there a little while later so we took it inside and put it in this globe thing we had and gave it sugar water and some mums. We put the bee which we think is a queen down in the sun and after a little while it started buzzing and moving around so we put it outside in the globe but she did not fly away so we took her and a flower that she was on out but she still did not fly away so we took her back in but she more sluggish and has been like that for the rest of the day and we put some more flowers in there. What should we do we really do not want her to die😱😱

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to GA

  213. I found a bee drowning in our bird bath and believe it’s a queen bee, we have gave her sugar water and put her in the sun to dry. I’ve now put her in a box with ventilation and leaves. I’ve left sugar so she can eat it and water to drink, but she isn’t moving only moving her legs and trying to get up. What should I do to help?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Madi

  214. Hi, I have had a little fuzzy humble bee flying around my garden for a few days. Today I saw her crawling around the ground. About half an hour ago she appeared on my daughter's leg. I encouraged her in to my hand and she crawled around up & down my arms and across my back, although very lethargically. I managed to get her to walk on to a piece of card & I placed her in a tub I have strawberry plants growing. I quickly googled and found advice to feed 30/70 honey/water mix. Whilst i was preparing this my son shouted that the little bee had fallen in under the soil. I think she probably dug her way in. We have a little sunshine here today so I have placed the tub in a sunny spot. Should I let her be or do u think she needs help? Thank you.

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Sharon

  215. Hi, I found a bee late last night so housed it in a shoebox overnight after giving her a small amount of sugar water. She was buzzing and vibrating her wings but I thought it best to wait until morning to release her. This morning I gave her some more sugar water and found some fresh wild flowers. She has been in her box in the sunshine but doesn't seem to want to energise herself to leave. She seems more sluggish than last night. What more can I do to help?!

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Storm

  216. Hello!

    I was wondering if there was a way I could help the bees so they don't go into the water in the first place. Whenever I go swimming and I see a bee in the water, I help it but I am not outside looking for bees all day. Just asking if there is anything I can do. Bye!

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Jane

  217. Hello!

    I was wondering if there was a way I could help the bees so they don't go into the water in the first place. Whenever I go swimming and I see a bee in the water, I help it but I am not outside looking for bees all day. Just asking if there is anything I can do. Bye!

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Jane

  218. Hello!

    Bees are my favorite animal/insect (i know, it's weird) but I was wondering what do do when a bee i sin your pool but has not yet died. What I do is take them out with a leaf, and give them sugar water from a spoon and put them in the sunlight. A lot of the times that works, but sometimes it is not enough. I know in some cases the bee can not be saved, but then one time I put the bee (after it had dried off) in a shady place and kept giving the bee food and shelter because she was not in the health to fly. I think that maybe if the bee is close to dying to not just leave it in the sun, but to give it sugar water or if you don't have that, honey. Maybe you could write some things you could do then just put them in the sun? Maybe it could save more bees than just the ones that have been in the water for a short amount of time. Thank you!

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Alice

  219. Hello!

    Yesterday at about 4pm I found a big fuzzy bumble bee on a path next to my house not moving much, I moved her to my deck so she didn't get trampled and checked on her at about 6pm. She had moved to a sheltered location and was resting (I think). I gave her some sugar water, she drank it and then became more active, vibrated her wings a few times and started walking about, then settled in a new spot. I left her alone hoping she would take herself off to somewhere she liked. This morning (9am) she is still on my deck in a sheltered spot. It's 8 degrees celsius and cloudy and I don't have any flowers in my garden, what can I do to help her today? Thanks in advance

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Gee

  220. I rescued a honey bee that was laying on the ground not moving at all. Gave it sugar water and kept it over night in a container with some grass, but it's still acting sluggish and isn't trying to fly at all or buzz. It's been raining quite heavy for the last 2 days. Kinda needing some help here

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Ashley

  221. 911 Bee Emergency

    I was at work today and got a call from my roommate that a swarm of bees had attached itself to a wood overhang at our house. He said they were wasps and to bring wasp killer home. I worked until dark brought home spray. To my disbelief there were thousands of honey bees laying on the ground under the area they had landed. He sprayed them with a mixture of soap and water. They seem to still be alive is there anything I can do to save them?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Paul Hancocki

    1. If it's mostly water, they may be alright still, especially if there's still a cluster of bees around the queen. But they're in dangerous circumstances (already when they're swarming, they have only the food in their stomachs to see them through until they locate a new home).

      If they've expended a great deal of energy covered in soapy water on the ground, they will likely need experienced human help. I would do a web search tomorrow morning for "beekeeper your-town" and see if either a local Beekeeper's Association, or local beekeepers themselves, pull up in the search results. You should be able to call around to find a beekeeper willing to come out and help, if the swarm of bees is still mostly intact by morning.

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

      1. Elise thank you for your guidance. Local keepers from Bryan's Bees came out and rescued the queen and a fairly good size clump of bees. About half of what parished. The new colony will thrive at it's new home in Semi Valley. Thanks again. I learned so much about these magnificent creatures in the past 48 hours. Amazing.

        Reply

        Leave a Reply to Paul Hancock

      2. Elise thank you for your guidance. Local keepers from Bryan's Bees came out and rescued the queen and a fairly good size clump of bees. About half of what parished. The new colony will thrive at it's new home in Semi Valley. Thanks again. I learned so much about these magnificent creatures in the past 48 hours. Amazing.

        Reply

        Leave a Reply to Paul Hancock

  222. Yesterday hundreds of worker honey bees had fallen all over our patio from a maple tree they had been getting pollen from. The sun had been out and then the weather changed and cold set in and clouds and a bit of rain started. We think it just was the cold temp but the kids went around gathering the bees gently and placing them in a jar...warming them by bringing them inside and as they regained their strength they let them fly away again outside. One bee seemed to struggle getting better so we gave it some raw local honey because that is all we had and it still struggled so we kept it in the jar overnight but unfortunately it fell on it’s back in the honey and is covered in it...so it can’t fly...it seems more perky this morning though...is there any way we can help it clean off?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Bex

  223. I found a bee yesterday covered in sticky stuff, I tried to help but found the bee this morning in the cold on her back, I have her in my kitchen on a bit of paper with a triangle bit of paper over her, she is really struggling and I don't know how to help.

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to TJ

  224. Hello! I’ve had a fly on my porch for two days and to my surprise, it was actually a little bee. I gave it some sugar water but It was quite chilly last night so your site convinced me to house it overnight. Good News is the bee must have gotten better but the bad news is that she somehow escaped from the box. I’m not so much worried about the bee being in the house but that she will starve. Any ideas where to look and to help continue to keep her alive? Thanks!

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to L Smith

    1. UPDATE! My plan worked! Last night I went looking for my escaped worker honey bee in the guest room... after doing the window method (making window the main light source in the room) and sure enough, she was right on the windowsill! 💛 Today it is in the low 50s so I’m not sure about releasing her, it looks like Saturday might be nicer. I also have not given plain water yet so I’m going to do that. I want to say though, I feel bad keeping her in the box even overnight like she really wants to get back... but I think it’s too cold, it’s supposed to rain today 😕 anyways try the window method if you have an escaped bee! I left a spoonful of sugar water right there for her But I’m not sure if she ate it... When I feed her myself with a dropper she’s been eating just fine once the ratio is right (once the water evaporates it gets too thick) 💛🐝💛... highly recommend a dropper because she just puts her tongue in directly and it doesn’t leak at all!

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Tessa

    2. I have this same issue! Mine was drowning in my 2 year old nieces swimming pool when I got home from my jog... I got her out and used a Kleenex to dry her off, I laid her out in the sun, but she was quite cold and not very responsive but I thought hands off would be a better approach. Later on that night I was worried so I looked up if bees can get too cold and freaked out when I found out how sensitive they really are, the temp was 48 degrees f and I was scared I lost her. So I ran outside and picked up the flowers I set her on and I swore I thought she was dead. But immediately after taking her inside I could see her feet wiggling, then the warmer she got she moved her legs more and more. I didn’t read to give sugar water until she was inside and had warmed up enough to move her legs fully, as soon as I have her some she perked right up, and actually flew a little bit but she was still a bit weakened. She was SO hungry though! Poor thing, had to have drank her body weight in sugar water. And she was kinda mad I spilled a little on her 😅 Anyways I left the guest room where I was keeping her to get a jar of some sorts or gather some plant matter like it said on here but when I came back to the room she wasn’t anywhere to be found! 😭🐝 I camped out there a while hoping I could hear her buzz or something but to no avail. Reading online it said its best to make it completely dark aside from a window so they go towards the window, so that’s the technique I’m using! 💛 Hopefully tomorrow she will be fit enough to be released. I have the added drawback that the other members of my family are still mainly brainwashed into thinking bees are public enemy number one 😓 So I don’t want them to find out, my mom would be mad that I brought a bee in the house let alone that she took off. I showed my brother and he was mad at me 😤 As for me I’m worried about her, she probably wants to get back to the hive already which I get but ugh this whole thing has been a learning experience for sure, I’m definitely carrying a small dropper bottle of sugar water with me in the future so I can help them more efficiently ❤️ I am so glad though because I wasn’t super afraid of bees before but this experience helped me get to a point where I was holding a bee! If I had not been so afraid it wouldn’t have gotten this bad for her but at least now I know...

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Tessa

  225. Yesterday i noticed a bumble bee laying on its side outside my front door.

    Later in the evening it was on the wall of the house.

    It rained heavy on and off the day so i offered some sugar water. It didnt take it. I placed a rose from my vase by the bee and in it went. Very slowly. Wings were crossed over its back and its rear legs seem to be dragging behind.

    Today the bee has stayed with the rose and looks more lathargic. It seemed lifeless but raised one leg. I have now made a bee box. Some cut flowers so it can dry out. There are a few little yellow mites on the bee. The bee is very fluffy and quite large. What can i do?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Heather

    1. That is a nice thing to do💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Rainbow

    2. That is a nice thing to do💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖💖

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Rainbow

  226. I have kept a soaking wet bee overnight in a box and it had livened up after giving sugar and water but when I just checked on it now, it's gothe lots of little tiny mite looking things crawling around neare it's head end. Do you know what they are and do it still release the bee as I was going things out do now it's light and dry outside?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Donna

    1. Hi i have just seen your bee post. I have the same thing. Mites n all. Have u had any luck?

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Heather

  227. I have found what I thought was a tired Bee. I have fed sugar water.

    Bee seems to perk up and then go down hill again.

    I took Bee home for over night. Kept in box with leaves with a drop of water on. Bee was moving around well. One leg seems less mobile and I have not seen wings moved other than to twitch. Bee has never buzzed ☹️

    I am at a loss how to help this bee any further? Is it cruel to keep trying

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Rose

  228. I want to add another 2 hives to my bee yard, would like to use my own stock of Bees to do this.

    What’s the best way to do this?.

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to James

  229. Hopefully saved a bee from cold

    Found him on my path, dosile

    Gave him sugar water, soon started moving,

    But its now dark, cold

    Will he be ok in a small box, holes in for the night,

    And is he a good ao bad bee, (heard some are bad for others)

    Thank you

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Karen

  230. Good evening! I’ve got a lost bee here that I need advice on. Found him sluggish on the ground in west London, he’s perked up now he’s inside and had some sugar water but the temperature is about 5-6 c tomorrow and I’m worried releasing him might be his end! Should I keep him until the temperature rises?

    Thanks in advance!

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Ross

  231. Hi, I found a Bumble Bee on its back lifeless, whilst walking home. I carried it home (15 mins away). There seemed to be some life so I gave it a bit of sugary-water! She was so much better, but it looks like the back leg is not opening out & she keeps falling onto her side or on her back! She’s getting about a bit now but there’s no buzzing sounds at all. I’m worried she won’t be able to fly if I let her outside! Can you help please?

    Thanks

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Marcie

  232. We found a bee in the garden and gave it some suger water but it has 2 missing legs,What do we do?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to George

  233. We found a bee in the garden and gave it some suger water but it has 2 missing legs,What do we do?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to George

  234. Hello, I found what I think is a queen bee on my decking yesterday, she was wandering around all around the decking with no real purpose. I gave her some sugar and water and it seemed to pick her up. Later on in the evening she climbed the wall of our house and made it nearly to the top as it became dark. This morning I found her on the decking soaking wet and I thought dead. A couple of hours later she emerged once again. I googled what to do and put her on some flowers where she fed from. She seems as though she cannot fly so I am now in the process of warming her up in the garage. How long do I need to do this for? She seems quite lively just not flying.

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Caryl

  235. I have found a bee in my garden. It appears to be soaked and struggling after being caught in a down pour. It is moving its legs ever so slightly now and again but looks like its giving up. I have taken it off the ground and placed it in a box with a little sugar water but it doesn't seem like it has any energy at all. Is there anything else I can do to save it !? Xx

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Amy

  236. I have found a bee in my garden. It appears to be soaked and struggling after being caught in a down pour. It is moving its legs ever so slightly now and again but looks like its giving up. I have taken it off the ground and placed it in a box with a little sugar water but it doesn't seem like it has any energy at all. Is there anything else I can do to save it !? Xx

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Amy

  237. I have found a bee in my garden. It appears to be soaked and struggling after being caught in a down pour. It is moving its legs ever so slightly now and again but looks like its giving up. I have taken it off the ground and placed it in a box with a little sugar water but it doesn't seem like it has any energy at all. Is there anything else I can do to save it !? Xx

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Amy

  238. I have found a bee in my garden. It appears to be soaked and struggling after being caught in a down pour. It is moving its legs ever so slightly now and again but looks like its giving up. I have taken it off the ground and placed it in a box with a little sugar water but it doesn't seem like it has any energy at all. Is there anything else I can do to save it !? Xx

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Amy

  239. Hi I have just found a,queen bumble bee sheltering under my tarpaulin that I use for my horses hay. I have brought her in and given sugar water but we have very high winds today approx 40-50 mph and other than some just opening cherry blossom no winter flowers should I just give her a rest then put her back or keep in until tomorrow when the weather is better? (It has also rained heavily all night) thanks Jo

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Jo

  240. Hello! I have a bumblebee in my garden since two days, doesn’t look as big as a queen. I put her in a box inside the house yesterday and she spent the night inside. I tried to give her some sugar and water but she didn’t take any. I tried to release her today but she stayed at the same spot in the garden for hours. I took her back inside now. she seems Very frail and tired, I wonder how long she can survivre like this and what else can I do to help her. It’s very cold outside and there are no flowers yet in my garden.

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Ibouh

  241. Hi!!

    So currently I’m at my house in england where there’s storm Dennis.

    As I left this morning , there was a bee in my porch, we’ve left it in some flowers and some water but I’m very concerned as only everywhere is saying that if it reaches 10 degrees or below they it can be fatal.

    I didn’t know what to do, should I bring them inside or leave them outside?

    Thank you!!

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Rachel Mettyear

  242. Hi!!

    So currently I’m at my house in england where there’s storm Dennis.

    As I left this morning , there was a bee in my porch, we’ve left it in some flowers and some water but I’m very concerned as only everywhere is saying that if it reaches 10 degrees or below they it can be fatal.

    I didn’t know what to do, should I bring them inside or leave them outside?

    Thank you!!

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Rachel Mettyear

  243. I saw a bumblebee struggling on my decking .It is quite big so I think it’s a Queen. It’s February and it’s was a very windy day. I fed it a bit of sugary water and placed it in a daffodil pot in the garden. It was still slow and clumsy when I checked on it after half an hour. So, I pooped it in a terranium with some leaves and brought her indoors to warm up. .

    After 10 mins she came to life . Buzzing and vibrating her wings trying to get out so I took her outside to reLease her. As it was 4:40pm I wanted to release her before darkness. I lifted the lid and the wind quickly slammed it back down . The bumblebee was rolling over and over like it had been bashed by the lid .

    I brought her back in to the house still in the terranium.

    It is now 7:30pm. She is alive just still sometimes but moving her limbs. Mobility has been affected by the looks of it but I can’t see any damage .

    I have put a leaf in with some surgery water but she’s not interested .

    Should I keep her in overnight and see how she is in the morning? I’m concerned she’s in a lot of pain and I’m prolonging her agony.

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Adele

  244. Found a queen bee , in the house , crawling up my partners leg freaking her right out! Have put her in a ventilated pot for tonight and hope she survives tonight . It's freezing outside so what to do tomorrow ? Thanks for any info .

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Jut

    1. If your partner survives the first night in the ventilated pot, maybe consider bringing her in and letting her sleep in the spare bed!

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to beehave

  245. Found a queen bee , in the house , crawling up my partners leg freaking her right out! Have put her in a ventilated pot for tonight and hope she survives tonight . It's freezing outside so what to do tomorrow ? Thanks for any info .

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Jut

  246. Found a queen bee , in the house , crawling up my partners leg freaking her right out! Have put her in a ventilated pot for tonight and hope she survives tonight . It's freezing outside so what to do tomorrow ? Thanks for any info .

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Jut

  247. We have, what I am 99% sure are, honey bees waking up....in early February and crawling around in the laundry room and under our sink. They are small,and can't fly. We can't find the hive but I don't want the hive to die either if they are waking up too early for hibernation. What do I do?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to KC

  248. Dear Madam,

    I found a honey bee 2 days ago in my kitchen. I tried to follow your tips but it looks like the bee does not want to drink sugar water on a tea spoon. It keeps trying to fly but it does not keep itself in the air. I made a staying place box so it stayed 2 days now. Also the weather here is now 6 Celcius and the wind is very strong. What should I do? I want to help the bee but the bee is not drinking. I feel sad for the bee. Thank you. Greetings Alan

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Alan

  249. I have just found a bumble bee on my cellar floor, it is fairly motionless although with a little blow the back end moved slightly. Any suggestions? As the weather is likely to get colder before we get to spring. Currently here it's night time and gales and rain so have left in the cellar but moved a little so not to be trodden on x

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Wendy

  250. Hi ,

    A bee has appeared in the bathroom today . I believe it's a hairy leg flower Bee , not 100% sure . It just gets onto window sill and sits there . Is there anything I can do to help .?

    The house is old so gaps etc leading to clay lump walls .

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Geoff

  251. Found distressed queen bee about 4pm yesterday. Now in small box in my greenhouse. Wouldn’t take sugar water yesterday. Storm Ciara in full force today, how long can I keep it in current state before I let it go?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Robert

  252. I have rescued a Queen Bee today, which was barely moving before. I’ve given her sugar water and left her in a box to chill out and re-coup. She’s doing lots of buzzing now and trying to fly, but every time she does, she ends up on her back. I don’t know if I should put her outside or not if she just keeps ending up on her back, maybe she’s not strong enough to fly? It’s sunny outside but only about 7 degrees x

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Lou

  253. I live in New England and it is winter up here. Last week we had a few days that were over 50 degrees F and i noticed a few bees flying around. Fast forward a few days and it was back to our usual 20-30 degree F weather and I found two honey bees curled up in the snow. I thought they were dead and brought one inside. A few minutes went by and it "came back to life". I gave it a snack and it started flying around the jar I had it in with holes on the top. It was so happy and cute! It was sunny, but cold outside. I brought it outside on my hand, but as soon as the cold hit it, it just curled up as if it were dead again. I read that this is how some bee species hibernate? I placed both bees under one of my bushes to keep them out of the rain and snow. Could I have done anything better? -Mikayla

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    Leave a Reply to Mikayla

  254. Hi, I found a huge bumblebee yesterday afternoon on the ground in a car park so, worried that she might get trodden on or driven over, I put her on a wall in the sunlight with a bit of sugar water, which she didn't seem too bothered about drinking. I've just checked this morning though and she's still sitting in that same spot today with dew all over her. She's definitely still alive so I'm wondering what I should do next or whether I should just leave her alone?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Laura

  255. Hi! I found a bee curled up on my patio on a very Wet cold day. my instinct was to get it out of the cold so I placed it in a small container still on the patio. It was still struggling after a few hours and so I brought it inside to warm up and gave it some sugar water. 30 minutes later and it was up with lots of energy so I placed it outside assuming it would be ok! The next morning it was back to how I found him, cold and helpless. Now i've given it more sugar water and brought it inside as it is still raining here and it has put its whole head into the sugar water...

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Danielle

  256. Hi, I helped a bee last night. Have sugar water and kept inside as wasn’t flying away and it’s cold out. Have let her out this morning and she’s still there tonight cold. I’ve put her in a proper breathable animal tent with some sugar water again. She’s climbing about her house and wings are opening but doesn’t fly. I’m keeping her warm tonight but what do I do from here? Keep going or let her go and she’ll probably die.

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Laura

  257. Hi, i found this bumble bee in my garden yesterday, i brought it in and gave it some sugar water, i fully expected after that it would revitalise the bee & it would be ready to fly off, but it didnt. It did seem very weak & as it was late in the day i decided it best to keep it overnight. I came down to the bumble bee on its back this morning with its legs tucked in, i picked the bumble bee up to examine it and couldnt see any sign of life, so i put the bumle bee back. About half an hour later the bumble bee started shaking & raised its wings, it hasnt really moved but is still shaking....just looking for any advice you could offer...thank you.

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Chantal

  258. I just rescued a honeybee on the beach in the sand where the tide came up , I gave it sugar water and it’s in a box moving more but keeps falling on her back and I have to help right her. I’m afraid to walk away! She was cold and wet

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to ML

  259. I found a large bumble in my garden three days ago. She is listless. I have brought her in each night in a cardboard box with a flower and foliage. I put her out each day with some sugar water which I don’t think she is drinking. I found her on my lawn which is Astro turf , so obviously she can’t burrow. Would it be best just to bring her indoors completely to hibernate until the weather warms up a little and what about food? I don’t want her to die. Unfortunately I am going away for a few nights. Thank you. Toni

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Toni

  260. Hi, I brought a bumble bee inside late this afternoon as it was frozen, almost dead. It has had some sugar water and revived. It has been wandering around the kitchen, but it is dark and freezing outside so didn’t want to put it out. It has found a warm spot by the radiator and seems to have gone to sleep. Will it be ok overnight will I need to feed it again? Thanks.

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Sally

  261. I found a bumble bee (I originally thought it was dead, as not moving) & have taken it inside where it warmed, so gave it sugar/water mix. It seems to be coming around well. I’m going to release it tomorrow, however I’m worried about releasing it as the temperatures are so low at the moment...will it survive? Should I go ahead & attempt to release?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Kezza58

  262. Hi. My bee mentioned earlier started lying on its back, but is alive. I haven't seen it take any sugar water except one a day ago. This morning I found it under a cupcake paper "cave," on its back. I used a twig, which it grasps, and rolled it upright. I put in a little filtered H20 with salt, as well as without, & it has the hummer feeder, a clump of grass (pulled from a cement crack) & the only flowers yesterday, some alyssum. (I mistakenly put the only other one I could find, red geranium, but took it out soon afterward, having read they don't like them. Also resisted flowering plants at the grocer, but will try to find clean ones today.) The bee's not lively, but upright on it's twig, sort of hanging, & the proboscis is somehow noticeable today. I thought I saw a bit of tongue earlier, but didn't have my glasses. Am losing hope, but have set the jar in direct (not terribly bright) sunlight, & may clear some another window area as the sun moves. None of the local bee people called back. There are a few yellow clovers outside, & I'm waiting till they open to bring some in. Also, the bee's wings are crossed. Could they be stuck?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Char

  263. A fuzzy black bee was not doing well outside in the wild area of my yard. Husband says it's a bumblebee, but it's all black with nacreous rosegold wings. Fuzzy legs. It's in a turtle bowl with paper towels & a few tiny flowers, & filtered water in a lid, which it ignores. Doesn't fly, but clings to a twig & it buzzled a bit once. 1st day a couple of drops H20 revived it, & also when it's near the heater at night. It's the 3rd night & it's falling on its back, but moving and clings to a twig, & then I help set it upright. It was more active before, stayed closest to the heater at night. It appeared to be drinking at the small hummingbird feeder I put in last night. Also sat on wet areas of paper towel each day when I put a few drops in. This afternoon was sunny, so I left the uncovered jar outside a while, but it made no moves. There's few flowers outside. Either species, I'm worried it's a queen, a burrower emerged too early?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Char

  264. Hi I've found a nearly drowned bumble bee in a puddle. I thought she was dead but did move when I touched her. She's quite large so assuming she's a queen. I've warmed her up in my office and she's moving around a lot now but won't touch the sugar water I've put out. Her wings are still quite wet but as she's now quite active I've put her back outside a currently not raining but it's very windy and temp say 12 degrees but the wind is colder but now she not moving at all. Should I bring her back in and keep her warm over the weekend then try releasing her again on Monday when I'm back at my office? Advice would be appreciated. Thank you

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Debbie

  265. Hi!

    My boyfriend found a bee in London while at work yesterday, he took it with him to revive in his van. It’s looking a lot better but wondered about releasing it as it seems very early for a Bee to be coming out of hibernation? Also, as he bought it home the bee is very far from where it was found and we won’t be able to take it back there. Is it ok to release them in an unfamiliar place?

    Thanks!

    Hayley

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Hayley

  266. Just wanted to say its 10pm here and my daughter saw a (what we think is a queen honey bee) hardly moving looking very sad on the floor of our shared flat stairwell. As we get lots of people and dogs up and down the stairs I've brought the bee in and gave it a small portion of the sugar water (it drank for ages) and seems a little better now. As it's cold and windy out I'm gonna move him to a shoe box like suggested until tomorrow. I've taken a photo and video. My daughter is over the moon now we helped the bee. Just wanted to thank you have a lovely day and happy new year! Xx Chloe & Lucy xx

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Chloe and lucy

  267. A bee just landed and got stuck in a dish of sunscreen. He is in the sun on a napkin and seems to be cleaning it off of him. Is there anything else I can do? I’m worried about his wings being coated with sunscreen.

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Jessica

  268. A bee just landed and got stuck in a dish of sunscreen. He is in the sun on a napkin and seems to be cleaning it off of him. Is there anything else I can do? I’m worried about his wings being coated with sunscreen.

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Jessica

  269. Disterbed a bumble bee have it indoors now has had suger water. Its winter not sure how to relese it.

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Lisa j close

  270. How do I take care of a young bumblebee I found out in the rain it's pretty damaged and not moving alot it's the end of december

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Minnie

  271. Hi,

    My son found a bee in his bathroom and asked me to rescue him/her. I currently have him in a big jar, and gave him a few drops of sugar water in water bottle lid. He has perked up and has been walking around and doing a little exploring. My question is; it is the end of December and cold and rainy. The high temps right now are around 43 degrees and the lows around 28 degrees. Is that too cold to put him back outside? Also, I haven't seen him trying to fly. Do you have any suggestions for my little guy?

    Thank you!

    Stephanie

    ps. I don't know what kind of bee I have rescued and if its a little guy or gal

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Stephanie

  272. I found a bee outside in the grass. I thought it was dead but I touched it gentle and it moved a bit. I brought it some sugar water but it didn't seem interested and was moving around very slowly and sluggishly. I brought it inside and after a while it began to move around much more, but still didn't seem interested in sugar water.

    I took it back outside and left it for fifteen minutes, after which it stopped moving again. It's quite cold here (45 f), and not sunny. I've taken the bee inside again and have put it in a box with some sugar water and plain water. Although it's moving quite a bit again, it hasn't opened it's wings and still shows no interest in the water. Is there anything else I can do to help it recover? I don't know how it could ever survive outside in this cold weather.

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Heather

  273. Can I release a bee in a different location then where I found it?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Sam

    1. Ideally, it's good to release them where you find them, but it depends on the type of bee and the time of year.

      Honey bees should always be released where you found them, and ideally even at a similar time of day if possible, since they use both landmarks and the position of the sun in navigation.

      If it's a very large, fluffy bee at this time of year, it's not so important to release them near where you found them, since they'll most likely be bumble bee queens seeking a place to hibernate overwinter.

      For other bees and on most occasions though, it's usually best to try to release them where you find them.

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

      1. Ok. I took her back, but she didn't fly away. I believe she is a carpenter bee. I brought her back home last night and this morning she is still alive. At this point I'm amazed and lost as to what I should do next. Thank you for all your time here. I followed your directions and she's still alive. So what do I do next for Frances the Bee 🐝

        Reply

        Leave a Reply to Sam

  274. Good morning! Yesterday afternoon I found what appears to be a queen bumble bee on my back porch. It was sunny and the temperature was around 75 degrees F. She wasn’t moving, so I offered her a spoonful of the sugar water mixture but she wasn’t interested. I left her alone, hoping she’d come to. This morning it’s foggy and in the 50’s, and the bee was still in the same place but covered in dew. I picked her up gently expecting her to be dead, but she moved slightly. She’s currently inside on my counter (72 degrees) with another offering of sugar water - which she again isn’t interested in. I’ve dabbed her with a piece of tissue so her hair isn’t wet anymore. When I dry her, she begins cleaning herself very slowly, but then stops. Her wings look smooth but I haven’t seen her separate them (and I won’t). Do you think she’s dying being that she hasn’t drank any of the mixture?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Jenn

    1. I am sorry to be replying so late with the holidays upon us. I think it's possible, but unlikely, that she's having problems because she hasn't drank any sugar-water mix. My main concern is that she was continually unmoving in 75 degree sunny weather. That is unusual behavior for a healthy bee. Was she in direct sunlight at that time?

      Other than doing exactly as you have done: helping her dry off gently, warming her up indoors, and offering her sugar water, there is not much more to be done for her. Warmth usually picks bees right back up if they are otherwise healthy; sugar water certainly helps too, but bees are typically active when warm, even if hungry.

      You might try dropping the sugar-water onto something like a pesticide-free dandelion or similar, to see if she responds to the color and smell of a real flower (dandelions are good, because bees knows them as a reliable off-season source of nectar an pollen, and their flowers are easily accessible to bees of all kinds).

      I never give up on a bee, so I would try her outdoors in full sun again if it's sunny and warm... even if she looks unmoving, they sometimes revive in direct warmth. Another thing you might try is to drop the smallest of sugar-water mix drops on one of her front feet, as they taste with their feet (but I'd try the flower first, since cold bees are clumsy, and get sticky easily).

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

      1. Update! After about 4 hours on my counter (after drying her with toilet paper, blowing on her gently, and offering more sugar water) she started to perk up and spread her wings. I took her outside when the sun came out and released her. She started walking around immediately (didn’t fly), but was in much better shape then when I found her. Thank you for creating this page as a resource, she may not have survived otherwise.

        Reply

        Leave a Reply to Jenn

  275. Hello Elise, just thought I'd give you an update on my beautiful queen Bee , I kept her in the box for a couple hours, she was walking around a lot so I took her outside as it had stopped raining although cold, the sun is out, she climbed on to the side of the box and I ordered her some sugar water, which she drank loads of, it was an amazing sight for me as I've never done anything like this before, to watch her tongue come out and lap it up, she then tried to fly but fell in to the grass, she then walked a few steps and took off high and flew away, so lovely to see, thank you for your advice xx

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Wendy

  276. It's winter in the UK and raining . There is a large bee in my garden very wet is there anything I can do to help it

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Wendy

    1. I think bringing your bee indoors (in a ventilated box) and letting her dry off somewhere warm might be the most helpful thing to do. It may take her a few hours to air dry, but it should be speeded up by being somewhere warm.

      It is possible very delicately to use the tip of a tissue to pull additional moisture from her fluff and speed her drying too.

      I would offer some drops of sugar water mix as well, while she's warming up indoors. Since it's early there, I'm hoping you'll be able to dry her off and warm her up enough to where she'll be able to fly again today, assuming it's not raining much later.

      If it is raining heavily, it's possible you might end up keeping her overnight in her box, somewhere relatively cool such as a garage. But ideally if there's a break in the rain later today, I would put her out (with her box open) once she's warmed up and dried off.

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

  277. Like to know if you have a company business support program as we would like to look at joining.

    We do offer organic honey as part of our branded organic lines in Australia.

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    Leave a Reply to Anthony

    1. I appreciate your interest! At this time, I have no partnerships or affiliations with any companies (donations received by generous individual visitors being the only source of income received, all of which is put towards the costs of updating and maintaining this website).

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

  278. I found a bee outside today hiding under a leaf. It was right under the water faucet I was about to turn on. To keep the bee from drowning I moved it to the edge of my garage. By the time I was ready to go back inside it was getting dark outside and it was 49 degrees. So I left the bee in my garage so it could get warm. I went outside and checked in the bee several times to try and see if it was ready to fly away. But over the course of an hour it hadn’t moved at all. So I brought it inside and put it in a box with holes in the top with bottle top full of sugar water. The bee is doing much better now after only an hour being inside the house. It’s flapping it’s wings and trying to crawl to the top of the box. I would put the bee back outside except it is currently 34 degrees outside and dropping. The weather forecast is showing it won’t be 55 degrees until Friday. Is it safe to put the bee outside? How long is it safe to keep the bee inside? Help!

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Sydney

    1. It's a good sign that your bee is moving with more energy when warm indoors. But since it's night time, you'll want to cool your bee down so that it doesn't think it's time to go, when it's so cold out. Place the box with your bee in the garage or somewhere that's more like outdoor temperatures, but not freezing.

      What is your weather forecast tomorrow? Is it a large fluffy bee? It would be nice if your bee could get going tomorrow, but if it's below 50, that's unlikely to happen. It won't hurt to keep your bee in its box for a couple of nights (plus the day in between), so long as you keep your bee at similar temperatures to the natural ones.

      If you're keeping your bee, it's also a good idea to provide it with sugar water in the day, either a few small drops near its front feet, or even drops of sugar water added on flowers cut from a pesticide-free area (though depending on your state, there may be few flowers at this time of year). I wouldn't leave the bottle top of sugar water in the box overnight, in case your bee clumsily stumbles into it while cold (sticky bees are hard to clean)!

      The other thing to do if you're housing your bee is simply to keep a good eye on them. If they get too warm during the day in their box, they might damage their wings trying to escape, not realizing that the conditions are so unfavorable outdoors. If that happens, simply move your bee's box to a cooler area, and that will naturally cause it to slow down and use less energy.

      Tomorrow, you can try your bee in its box outdoors with the lid off, after warming your bee up first indoors. But if it's below 52 or so, I'd suggest holding onto your bee until Friday. When Friday comes, warm your bee up well indoors in a warm room, and offer sugar water, so your bee is as energized as possible. Then put its box out, with the lid off, in the late morning or around noon, once the day is starting to warm up well (and ideally in direct sunlight).

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

      1. It is a large fluffy bee. I kept the bee in my garage all day today. I picked some flowers and dropped the sugar water onto the petals. The bee was okay and moving this morning and this afternoon, but it’s quit moving altogether since night fall. Is that a bad sign? It’s currently 29 degrees outside. Is it safe to keep the bee in my garage at this temperature? It’s going to be 53 degrees and sunny tomorrow around 2 o’clock. Temperatures are shown to not get much higher than that for the rest of the week. Will it be okay to let the bee go tomorrow during that time? Thanks for your help.

        Reply

        Leave a Reply to Sydney

        1. It's normal for your bee to quit moving altogether come nightfall, it's called entering a state of torpor, and it happens when a bee is cold, because they're cold-blooded. Your bee will 'revive' with warmth tomorrow, so long as she is healthy.

          I would bring your bee indoors from the garage in the morning, in her box, to a nice warm room, so that she has a few hours of warming up well before the middle of the day. Offer more sugar water on the flowers tomorrow too. Place your bee in the direct sun tomorrow, with the lid open, once your bee is fully warmed up.

          It's hard to say the exact time, I might try her out there maybe around 1pm, but there's this trade-off since temperatures are still on the low side for her.

          A large fluffy bee likely means a young queen bumble bee, looking for a place still to hibernate for winter. The more food you can get into her before she leaves, the better. It may take her a little while still to get going once she's outside, but the closer she can take off to the warmest part of the day, the better.

          It may well help to breathe warm air on her too, if she's still a bit sluggish when you place her box outdoors. Bumble bee queens can generate a good amount of warmth with their own wing muscles, but the warmer she is to begin with, the better her chances!

          If she doesn't take off tomorrow let me know, as there's a fallback plan here, which is to prepare her a place for safe hibernation... but ideally she'll choose her own place naturally.

          Reply

          Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

          1. I brought the bee inside at 8am and set her box in my kitchen near a window. When I got home from work and checked the box again at 1pm she hadn’t moved any from the night before. I put her in my hands and blew on her and still she didn’t move. It’s currently 56 degrees outside. I’ve had her sitting outside in the sun for almost an hour with no sign of movement. Is there a chance she won’t come out of torpor? Did I do something wrong?

            Reply

            Leave a Reply to Sydney

            1. That's unfortunate that she is not perking up in the sunlight, especially as it's a reasonable (if low) temperature for her. They fall into these states of torpor when they're outdoors at night, but they typically come right out of them when they're warmed up. It may simply be too cold for her though, even in direct sunlight... possibly she lost her indoor warmth too quickly. Bumble bees can generate their own heat to an extent (by decoupling their wing muscles and then vibrating them, which looks as though they're shivering). But she needs energy to do that.

              Is there a place indoors where you could warm her up to close to 70 degrees or so? I realize it's getting a bit late again today, I'm not sure what your timezone is, and it's possible that it would be better to try for tomorrow, depending on the temperature and time of day.

              Has she extended her tongue and had any sugar water, that you've seen? That would be the only other concern, in terms of a lack of energy.

              You mentioned finding her hiding under a leaf, and that may have been her attempt at finding a place to hibernate, since it is better than nothing (though hardly ideal). Typically they dig small holes for themselves underground, to stay frost-free. You could try putting an upturned ceramic plant pot or similar, stuffed with some insulating material like pieces of grass, in such a way as not to have the material fall out easily from the bottom when it is upturned. Then raising the edge a bit on one side with some small rocks, so as to provide a way in and out of the plant pot. They do sometimes hibernate in such places, and when they don't have the energy to dig a hole for themselves, they'll often readily take to a location like that. She does still need stored energy to make it all the way through winter though, which is why I wonder if you've seen her drink any sugar water?

              Reply

              Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

              1. I did not see her drink any. The drops on the petals look undisturbed, so I don’t think she drank at all yesterday. The first night I had her she drank out of the bottle top for 4mins. Later that same night I watched her drink for another 3mins. I’d put shredded cotton balls in the box and when she wasn’t drinking she was hiding under the cotton balls. She hasn’t moved from under them since that first night. Is it possible she’s already hibernating and that’s why she didn’t leave yesterday?

                Reply

                Leave a Reply to Sydney

                1. I apologize for my late reply, I've been out all day. Yes, it seems like her instinct (outdoors under the leaf, and in the box under the cotton balls) is to hibernate. If she's in your garage, already under the cotton balls, and no longer drinking, that may well be what she is doing.

                  One thought here is to add some additional insulation (more shredded cotton balls should work) and put her box outdoors with her inside it, underneath some sort of frost-free shelter like a large plant pot, with an edge raised so that there's a ground-level entrance/exit.

                  Another thought is to keep her in her box in your garage, since that's a frost-free environment that will be at outdoor temperatures for the season. If you do that, you would need to move her out in very early spring, otherwise she might have trouble finding her way out of the garage. And I think you'd still (at that time) want to put something additional over her box, to protect her from frost.

                  Reply

                  Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

  279. I noticed a bee (I believe a worker bumble bee)on a wall near my back door this morning around 10am, and he didn’t move all day (it’s now almost 6). I tried to give him sugar water, but since he was on a wall it was difficult. It’s getting quite cold out and it’s really foggy so I gently pushed him into a shoe box. I put some herbs from my garden in there for him (mint, lavender and rosemary), and left a few drops of sugar water near his head. He’s currently on my garage and seems to be feeling a little better - he’s moving his antenna around a it now, but he’s just staring at the wall and not moving.

    What should I do if he doesn’t start feeling better? Is there anything else I can try besides sugar?

    Thanks in advance for your help!

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Jess

    1. Don't worry about your bee being inactive tonight, as they are much less active in the evenings (and also when they're cold). I'd keep your bee overnight in the shoebox in the garage (on a shelf perhaps, somewhere unlikely to be discovered by ants), with the few drops of water and springs of garden herbs.

      What I would do tomorrow morning is to warm your bee up indoors for a half hour or hour or so (depending on your bee's behavior... the idea is to help your bee become more active faster, and if it begins to buzz a bit with its wings, then it's time to go outdoors). I'm hoping it might be sunny there, given where you live?

      Aim to put your bee outside near where you found it, in its box with the lid off, sometime after 10am, once the day is warming up more (unless it looks as though it will warm up sooner). Placing your bee in full sun will help too, if it is sunny. It may take your bee an hour or two more to get going, but being warmed up should help speed it on its way, and if it drinks some sugar water, that'll help too!

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

  280. Hello, Thank you so much for your website!!! I have a few questions about caring for a lost bee. I found a worker bee inside our house fumbling around on the cold tile floor. We fed it some sugar water and set “him” up in a box for the night because it is rainy and cold tonight. We are due to have rain for the next day or two and were wondering how to care for Mr. Bee until it is warm enough to release him. Should we keep him in a dark box and adding sugar water to his dish? Open his box and allow him to fly around our bathroom? Offer fresh flowers? We live in Southern California and the weather is expected to be in the low 60’s in a few days and the rain should stop in about 1-2 days.

    Thank you for any advice you can offer.

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Vern

    1. I do apologize for replying late, various life events here have impacted my response times recently!

      I wouldn't recommend letting your bee fly around the bathroom during the day, as it might be hard to return to the box at night, and it might get stuck somewhere too. Ideally it'd be nice to have your bee know that it's daytime during the day though, and then kept dark at night.

      If there's a break in the rain, with temperatures over 55F, you might try releasing your bee earlier too, well-warmed and topped up on sugar water. Otherwise, you can hold onto your bee, keeping it cool and dark at night, and lighter and a bit warmer during the day.

      One thing to watch for would be that, if your bee is very warm, it is possible to hurt itself trying to escape; it's easy to reduce that inclination simply by cooling them down, and in this case, it's for the better to hold onto your bee in the bad weather, and then release your bee once conditions are favorable for flying home.

      I'd definitely add some flowers (that are known to be pesticide-free) to the box too, to add a little color and interest. If your bee is drinking fine from the sugar water dish, then there's no need to add sugar water to the flowers (sometimes that's a way for them to drink if they don't realize the sugar water is food). The flowers will lose their nectar quickly, but are mainly there for 'emotional support', since it is clear from studies that bees feel simple emotions, and can be more 'optimistic' if given good circumstances.

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

  281. I found a beautiful bumble bee outside on my patio yesterday. It's very cold here at the moment and after leaving sugar water out for it, I woke thismorning to find it in the same place, moving very slowly, not looking the best. I took it inside, leaving more sugar water beside it but it didnt even go near it. After a few hours of it just moving slowly around the floor i put it back outside to see how it coped. I checked after about an hour and it had almost rolled up (because of the cold im guessing) so I took it back in again. It seems to be moving more and is veering towards the heat of the fire (it's not near the fire don't worry). I really don't know what to do for the poor thing, it won't touch the sugar water and it doesn't seem interested in flying off as it's wings haven't budged since I first encountered it. (They don't look damaged in any way) I don't want to put it back out in the cold tonight but I feel so cruel having it in a box overnight, I'd be terrified something will happen over night. What should I do

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Lizzie

    1. I am so sorry to be replying so late, something in life came up and I haven't been checking my email.

      I would bring your bee in for sure, and warm her up as much as possible, in a supervised way (since indoor heat, especially from a fire, can be very drying). Don't worry about keeping her in a ventilated box overnight, so long as she is safe and not freezing, it will be a better place for her to recover.

      Do you think you could place the few drops of sugar water such that her front feet might touch them? Bees taste with their feet, and so it might encourage her to drink if she needs additional energy.

      The goal here is to restore your bee's energy before transitioning her back outdoors to an appropriate place to overwinter. She should already be hibernating underground, but since she isn't, she's very vulnerable. A bumble bee is only ever about a half hour away from starvation when flying, though they can go much longer if they're not moving much.

      Let me know if your bee shows signs of improvement and activity as she warms up, and if she takes any sugar water.

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

  282. Hi

    We found a bee half frozen in water- amazingly still alive this morning.

    Weve bought him inside put in a deep dish with some water/sugar solution..

    Some 12 hrs later, hes still alive but still look very wet and crawling.

    Not sure whether to keep him like this or put him out of his misery. Your help would be appreciated

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to KT

    1. Update- bee still alive. Put him in a shoebox with sugar solution.

      Same situation as Lizzie in post above.

      Still moving, but not fluffy and it has dried up.

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to KT

      1. I am so sorry to be replying so late, something in life came up and I haven't been checking my email. Is it a large fluffy bee (likely a bumble bee queen if so)? How does your bee respond to indoor warmth, does that improve her level of activity?

        My inclination would be to warm your bee up well indoors close to some heating source, but keeping a very close eye on your bee's behavior, as artificial heat can be very drying. Warmth should help restore your bee to activity; though she may have struggled in the water for some time, so even if she is warm, she may be so low on energy that it may not improve her visible state too much.

        If you can warm her up well, and offer a few drops of sugar water, that would be a way to see if she can recover from her ordeal. I doubt there are flowers about there now, on which to add drops of sugar-water, but most bees will drink sugar water drops that are placed just below their heads, especially if they get their feet in it just a little first, as they taste with their feet.

        Let me know if your bee shows signs of improvement with additional warmth, and also whether she takes any sugar water. She will need to be transitioned outdoors once she's better (she should be hibernating underground if she's a queen bumble bee), but the first goal here is to restore her energy.

        Reply

        Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

        1. Thank you for your reply.

          Yes from your description a queen bee.

          We did everything as suggested but I think she must of been in the water too long, as her 'fur' and wings never recovered.

          She lasted over 24hrs though.

          Hopefully we wont find anymore, but know where to turn to if we do.

          Many thanks

          Reply

          Leave a Reply to KT

  283. I have a what I expect to be a queen bumble bee, i found her slumped on a pavement yesterday. I have her in a large plastic container and keep checking her.. I want to release her but she still seems weak. Done sugar water, she has a flap every so often, she tells me to back off sometimes yet other times luvs a little stroke. But the weather is so windy she just can't seem to manage to get going.

    How else can I help her

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Hayley

    1. Sorry to be replying so much later than you wrote, I hope your bee is alright if she is still with you.

      I don't know what your weather forecast is there, but I'd hold on to her in her enclosure until it's less windy, keeping her cool in the dark at night, and then in the light and warmer during the day, to keep her daily rhythms going. And continuing to offer sugar water.

      Large bumble bee queens need plenty of energy to take flight, as well as favorable conditions. But technically, she can find a place to burrow overwinter to hibernate without needing to fly, so long as she's able to walk across the ground, and so long as there's suitable areas within easy walking distance for a bee.

      I wonder if you might look for a suitable spot outdoors with loose soil, covered in leaf litter, as they seem to favor such spots in order to dig their little holes in the ground. Something sheltered from rain ideally, but also somewhere that will get the sun especially in spring.

      Maybe you could hold onto her for a few days waiting for better weather, then on a better day, warm her up well, make sure she's had some sugar water, and release her in such a spot that looks favorable for a bumble bee to dig. Perhaps keeping an eye on her after releasing her, to see if she looks as though she's able to explore on her own and find a safe spot underground for winter.

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

      1. I used a upturned pot full of dried leaves inside and a cardboard container, all filled up with compost. Small opening at the front. It's quite sheltered there. She happily entered. I place a couple of flower heads at the opening and marker pen betsie bee's home. Fingers crossed it's warm enough for her. Thank You for your response and lovely page x

        Reply

        Leave a Reply to Hayley

  284. I found a bee frozen this morning , I brought it indoors and placed in front of some steam then left it in a small box. On my return from work the bee is alive! It has crawled out of the box, I haven’t seen it fly and it’s moving very slowly. November in England with - temperatures, what should I do with it ? Thanks

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Kel

    1. Is this a large bumble bee by chance? If so, she'll need a place to hibernate without freezing. Each young queen usually digs her own little hole for herself underground, in which to overwinter.

      I wouldn't warm her up too much if your temperatures are that low... at least, I don't think so, but I'm assuming you've already had cold temperatures and that she should, ideally, already be hibernating. Typically when finding bees with interrupted hibernation, it's good for them not to "wake up" fully and lose stored energy that way, which they'll need for overwintering.

      I think you could put her back out either near some undisturbed leaf litter, or promising loose unfrozen soil, or a similarly unlikely-to-be-disturbed spot where she could burrow her way underground.

      Another idea might be to place an upturned flower pot stuffed with some insulating straw or similar substrate on the ground, resting one edge of the rim on some pebbles/rocks so as to provide ground-level access inside. She might take to that as a place to stay, and so long as it protects her from frost, she should be alright.

      If it's a honey bee instead, then she'll need to get back to her hive. The thing to do in that case would be to fully warm your bee up, offer her sugar water, and release her at the warmest possible point in the day. If she's well warmed up and energized, she should be able to get back, where she can overwinter with her hivemates.

      If it's some other kind of bee, it'll be hard to prescribe specifically what that bee would need, but I'd go the honey bee route, and warm the bee up, offering sugar water, and releasing in the warmest part of the day, so that it has the highest chances of getting where it needs to bee.

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

      1. Thank you for your reply. I believe she is a bumblebee quite large. She was frozen solid this morning, so I am amazed she is still alive! I will will leave her indoors tonight and try make her a nest in the morning. Thank you again.

        Reply

        Leave a Reply to Kel

  285. Hi! My daughter and I found a bumble bee under the recycling bin in the very cold day. He looks like hibernating (we had several occasions in the past, but it was an early spring or fall, so they woke up and flew away next day). We live in Boston so it’s already very cold outside. We’ll have 51 degrees day this Friday so my question is I should wake him up and release if he wakes up, or keep him through the winter... please let me know if you have a good idea in this case.

    Thank you so much!

    Mari

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Mari nishimura

    1. If your bee is unmoving, I'd definitely cover it with something to protect it from frost, snow, wind, and such. Perhaps some loose straw or dried grass over the bee (placed over it gently), along with an upturned flower pot lifted at one edge by some rocks so that the bee had a ground-level exit from the enclosure if desired?

      I think that'd be better than trying to wake up your bee, because it's important to conserve energy for hibernation ideally. Although if your bee wakes up naturally on Friday when it's a bit warmer, then that's fine, but I'd still cover your bee like this to protect it, and then it can decide to hibernate there if it would prefer.

      Usually, bumble bees should dig themselves a little burrow in the ground for overwintering, but sometimes they do things like hibernate under planks of wood, or undisturbed leaf litter, or under things like recycling bins.

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

  286. I need help I found a worker honey bee outside and next to my pool. I think she might have fallen in and managed to get out it is reasonably cold out side and midday now it occasionally moves it’s wings and it’s abdomen is constantly going up and down it is very sluggish so I brought it inside I’m not sure if I should keep it through the night in a shoebox like you listed or if I should put it outside and see if it flies away.

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Audrey

    1. Also, if she fell into your pool, she will have expended a fair bit of energy struggling (for however long she was in there). It takes them a while to dry off fully, especially on cooler days.

      Since it's later in your day there, she may need to spend the night with you in a ventilated box. Keep her box somewhere that's coolish overnight, and then in the morning warm her up nicely indoors, and offer her more sugar water (just a few small drops, so she doesn't get sticky accidentally).

      If she doesn't recognize the sugar water as food, you could also try adding drops of sugar water to a cut flower such as a dandelion, and putting that in there with her.

      Once she's well warmed up, she should be able to fly off. My one caution is that sometimes, they struggle for too long in a pool before we find them, and do not always make it, no matter what we do. If there's some sun to put her out in, that will help. But since it's the time of year for cooler weather, it'd be good to warm her up indoors first so that she has an extra boost of warmth to help her fly home.

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

    2. Have you tried offering a sugar water mixture to your bee? Are you expecting any sun soon?

      Warmth and sugar water should help your bee get going again, but if she's not active enough to fly off today, I'd keep her overnight to protect her from predators and weather.

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

  287. Hi - will a bee survive a salt chlorinated pool? We fish them out and let them dry out in the sun but not sure how bad the chemicals are for them?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Kaye

    1. It seems as though bees are often attracted to water with salt added, so it's not surprising that you find them in your pool. They need sources of water anyway, and a water source with a little salt or trace minerals is often more appealing than one without.

      Chlorine, on the other hand, cannot be good for them. It's not particularly good for any living thing. It depends how chlorinated the pool is, how much of an issue it is for them.

      One of the issues with honey bees is that it seems as though once they decide on a source of water, all the bees go there, and it's hard to get them to go anywhere else, since that "knowledge" of a good water hole stays with the hive.

      For that reason, it'll be hard to get these bees to do anything other than continue going to your pool. It is also speculated that bees have come to associate chlorine with salt when it comes to finding water. Additionally, most chlorine used for pools is in fact a type of salt, and that may explain their attraction to it, even when it's not a healthy source of salt for them.

      Fishing them out will certainly help them live another day though! I wish that putting an alternative source of water nearby would do the trick, but it sounds unlikely to help, given their attraction to salt chlorinated pools. I've read of some beekeepers adding salt to a bird bath of water, with pebbles inside, to provide something desirable for bees that is still safe for them to get their water.

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

  288. Hi, I keep finding a honeybee outside at night when I go to get the washing in. I either leave her be or put her under our veranda in a pot with flowers if it’s going to be a rainy night. I can’t be sure it’s the same bee of course but I just find it odd. I’ve tried googling lots of different things to find out why a bee would be out alone at night but nothing comes up. Appreciate any ideas or answers you might have. I just feel a bit sorry for her. Thanks 😊

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Paige

    1. It is odd to find a honey bee outdoors at night, they do not like spending nights out, but always try to get back to their hives. If it were any other kind of bee, it wouldn't be unusual in the same way.

      I assume you don't see this bee (if it is the same bee) during the day? Ah, and you're coming into your summer weather there, I see.

      Currently, I have no good answer for you. Bumble bees, even though they are social creatures like honey bees, do spend nights out sometimes too. Typically males, but also females in order to slow the progress of intestinal parasites (which are slowed down by the cold).

      I do think all bees are individuals too. For instance, we'll see bumble bee workers go sneaking eggs into other bumble bee nests, even though they're not allowed to have their own eggs in their main colony. Some honey bees sit around more than others. It's just possible your bee—however strange it may sound for a social insect—likes time on her own. I'm not saying that's the case here, more of an outside possibility, but I do think it's a possibility.

      If you wished to be ascertain whether it's the same bee or not (if you still have one hanging about, that is!), there might be a way to gently tag your bee while she's cold... that's how much of the bee science is done. I know I've heard of using tiny dabs on non-volatile paint... that would really bother me to do though, for all it's been helpful in experiments. A tiny bit of colored chalk applied with a thin paintbrush might stay on well enough to be visible the next day, without bothering the bee. Sometimes careful scrutiny of a bee up-close also reveals individual characteristics, such as a slightly tattered wing, a bit of unusual fluff, and such.

      It's certainly unusual to have such a honey bee visitor nightly, if it's the same bee!

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

  289. Hello,

    I found a bumble bee on my garage floor yesterday. She was very sluggish.

    I've put her on some newspaper in a safe corner and given her some sugar water but i dont know what to do next ....

    She looks a little perkier today.

    Should i put her outside ??? Or try and make a box for her ???

    Its getting cold here and i think she should be hibernating already ...

    Help :-(

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Sarah

    1. I apologize for replying late here, and I'm not sure if you still have your bee or not. I would have kept the bee overnight, only because she'd be more likely to be safe that way. But they naturally do spend nights out in the cold too, so she should have been fine either way. Cold always makes them sluggish and inactive.

      Today, if you're still keeping track of her, I'd try offering sugar water and also warming her up well indoors if your weather looks at all decent today (around or above 10C). I would put her outside, well-warmed and hopefully fed, at close to the warmest part of your day. I might be tempted to look around for a good spot outdoors too, but bees will follow their own whims in looking for a place to hibernate. Undisturbed soil that is easy to burrow into is ideal.

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

      1. Hi Elise,

        Thank you for getting back to me.

        She was still tucked up in the garage this morning, but looking a little livelier. It raining here just now so hopefully it will clear up later and i will open the garage doors and see if i can encourage her out.

        It would be great if she would decide to hibernate in our garden, maybe we will see her in the spring.

        Take care,

        Sarah

        Reply

        Leave a Reply to Sarah

      2. Hi Elise,

        Thank you for getting back to me.

        She was still tucked up in the garage this morning, but looking a little livelier. It raining here just now so hopefully it will clear up later and i will open the garage doors and see if i can encourage her out.

        It would be great if she would decide to hibernate in our garden, maybe we will see her in the spring.

        Take care,

        Sarah

        Reply

        Leave a Reply to Sarah

  290. I have a bumble bee here with me that has almost certainly been poisoned. I really don’t know what to do. She’s been with me all afternoon. Her two friends were dead next to her when I found them. She’s moving a little more now but I’m at a loss.

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Kat

    1. Oh no, I'm so sorry to hear that. I never like to give up on them, so I wonder—as a kind of outside chance—do you think she'd take some sugar water (or has she already)? I'm simply thinking about the possibility of flushing her system a bit with something safe.

      Do you suspect pesticides? I'm assuming so. Acute pesticide poisoning is very hard to watch happening to a poor bee :( There is often a lot of involuntary twitching involved, and their long tongues tend to hang out near the end of their lives.

      The fact that she's still alive suggests there's some hope though. Is she relatively warm indoors with you? Do you have any bee flowers nearby (dandelions work well when not much else is flowering)? I'm thinking about adding them to whatever you have her in, to see if she might perk up a little with flowers nearby (they would need to be safe though, in terms of no possible pesticides).

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

      1. I’ve tried to give her some sugar water yes. She was a little less sluggish for a short time. Her tongue was hanging out for the most part but seems to have gone in now. I was very careful holding her in one hand and letting her drink from a teaspoon with the other. But I honestly couldn’t say whether she got any - she cleared off her face a little which was the first real movement since picking her up earlier today. i also tried just cleaning her a little with a tiny food brush - I got a little too much on her face. I’ll try the flowers if I can find some. No pesticides in my yard, no. It’s heartbreaking to see!

        Reply

        Leave a Reply to Kat

  291. Hello,

    I am in Chicago and tonight I found a bee outside that was freezing (it's 44 degrees) so I brought it inside and it seems to be ok. Tomorrow the high is 40 and on Wednesday we'll reach 50 with possible rain but then were expected to drop back into the 30s for a few days. What is the best thing I can do for the bee?

    Thank you!

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Lauren

    1. What sort of bee is it, large and fluffy (like a bumble bee), or thinner and less fluffy and striped (like a honey bee)?

      Those temperatures are not very bee-friendly, and I think perhaps Wednesday (with temperatures near 50, even despite possible rain) would be the only likely day to release your bee safely. I would warm your bee up very well indoors first, as well as offering a few drops of sugar water, and only release your bee once it seemed "all buzzed up" with warmth and energy, towards the warmest part of your day, and ideally placed in a spot with direct sunlight.

      In the meantime today, I'd keep a close eye on your bee to see how it behaves. It should be more active during the day, but not too active (you don't want it buzzing around its enclosure trying to escape, as that will use up energy). Placing the enclosure in a cooler room will calm your bee down if that happens. Make sure to offer a little sugar water (just a few drops, so as not to end up with a sticky bee)! Your bee should be just fine spending a day with you.

      If it's a honey bee, I'd release it in the exact spot I found it so she can find her way back to her hive. If it's a very large bumble bee, then I'd look for a spot where there's plenty of soil and hopefully leaf litter and such (a park?), for her to find a place to hibernate for the winter (since it's the time of year for young bumble bee queens).

      If she doesn't leave on Wednesday, then you'll likely end up with your bee throughout the following freezing days. What to do in that case really does depend on the type of bee. If she is a young bumble bee queen, she might choose to hibernate in something as simple as a plant pot filled with soil loosely, where she can dig into the ground so she doesn't freeze. If she's a honey bee, then she'll definitely need to get back to her hive for winter. It's unlikely she's another type of bee, given the time of year.

      I hope you have luck warming her up well on Wednesday! Aim to begin warming her (in a nice warm room indoors) about an hour before the warmest part of your day, ensuring she has as long a window as possible of close-to-50-degree temperatures in which to try to find her own spot for winter. Offer some more drops of sugar water then too, so that she's as energetic as possible before taking her chances in the cold weather outdoors.

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

  292. Hi,

    I have found a large bee, very docile, in my kitchen last night, I have offered sugar water and put in a box overnight to protect from predators. I put him or her back outside in the sunshine today but other than waving it's leg at me it hasn't moved all day. I have brought it back in today but I'm not sure what to do next, do I just keep it in a box with some sugar water until it feels ready to go or do I need to do something else? I just want to do whats right for the poor thing.

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to David

    1. That's surprising that she stayed in the same spot all day (though certainly not unheard of). Was it cold today, even in the sunlight?

      I'm guessing it's a young queen bumble bee at this time of year, and so her goal will be to find a place underground to hibernate over winter (and forage enough to build up her winter reserves of fat).

      By the way, the leg waving (typically middle legs) is usually an expression of wishing you to give the bee a little more space.

      There's no harm in bringing your bee in each night for a few nights running, but ideally she would find her own way. If it's been cold even during the day (near or below 10C) then it might help to warm her up more first before setting her out that day.

      Sugar water and warmth usually help get a bee going, but sometimes they take their time, and I've also seen them in the same spot each day (when it's either been cold or wet).

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

  293. I found a bumblebee outside and took her in. I didn’t realize how injured she was until I got her in and tried to feed her. She is missing the bottom half of all of her feet, an antenna, and one wing is fairly inoperable. I tried to give her a drop of honey, which she ate almost all of, but then she got up and started rolling in it. She is now covered in honey, but mostly active. I’m worried she won’t be able to clean herself off properly without most of her legs to reach places. What should I do to help her? Or is it better to just let nature take its course?

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Michelle

    1. I'm so sorry to hear about your bee, she sounds as though she's in a position where the most you can do is keep her comfortable, since her injuries (the wing particularly) will make it fairly impossible for her to have a normal bee life (they can actually do alright without part of a leg or antenna, but they do taste things with their feet, so losing the bottom half of all of her legs is unfortunate indeed). But the wing is the most concerning, because without the ability to fly, she will not last long outdoors.

      Sugar water is easier to get off a bee than honey... for sugar water, I usually advise a few drops of less-than-warm (but not cold) water dropped on the bee to dissolve the sugars, but I don't think honey will be easy to remove by either your bee or yourself. It's probably not all the world for her to have some honey on her, as long as she's with you... if she was outdoors, that would attract ants, and she would undoubtedly be taken apart (likely while still alive) by the ants, along with them consuming the honey on her.

      I guess if I could gently remove some honey from her I would, but I wouldn't advise the water since I don't think it will really do much to dissolve the honey, and having a cold wet bee isn't ideal either. I'd bring some flowers in if you still have them (dandelions would do) and kind of make her an interesting little area for her to live in, while continuing to supply her with honey for as long as she's alive.

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

  294. Hi,

    I rescued an almost dead bee a few days ago. I live in Southern California where we recently had very strong winds and fires. I found the bee early morning wet and almost dead. I rescued it, put it inside a large plastic container over a paper towel. I also placed pure bee honey with wax that my mother in law brought from lithuania on a small plastic spoon and water in the container. By late afternoon the bee was clearly back to life and thriving. However, the winds were still really strong the following few days so I did not want to release the bee. What should I do know? If I release the bee will it be able to find the hive? Or is it just going to die. I feel it's cruel to keep it in the container and also cruel to let it out if it will just end up back where it started. Thank you!!

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Tal

    1. Strong winds are certainly dangerous for bees... they won't be able to fly in winds that are over 25mph or so. Do you have an idea as to whether it's a honey bee (smaller and thinner), a bumble bee (fluffier and larger), or some other kind of bee?

      If it's a honey bee or smaller bumble bee, it will have a hive to get back to (if it's a really large bumble bee, or a solitary bee, it won't be needing to get back to a hive... large bumble bee queens overwinter on their own underground). In the case of bees with hives to get back to, it's important to release them close to the place you found them, otherwise they won't be able to find their way back home.

      I think I'd judge whether to keep it or not based on wind conditions, type of bee, and your bee's behavior. If winds are above 25mph, I'd keep your bee in. If it's a honey bee, she will need to get back to her hive sooner rather than later, but she's still not going to be able to fly in strong winds. Bumble bees seem a bit better in strong winds, but still I wouldn't release a bee if your winds are above 25mph.

      In terms of your bee's behavior, I'd just watch to make sure that your bee is active during the day, and not seeming to deteriorate in terms of daily energy. So long as your bee is fed, she should be able to live in captivity for some time, but I agree that the sooner you can release her safely, the better.

      Reply

      Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

      1. Thank you so much for advise. I believe it's a honey bee. My concern was that she would not find her way back to the hive. So glad that is not an issue. Any yes, when winds die down, I will release during same time of day and in same location as I heard that bees tend to navigate using the position of the sun. Thanks again.

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        Leave a Reply to Tal

  295. I live in Kansas and when out trick or treating tonight my 6 yr old spotted a bumble bee that needed help. I scoped it up and brought it home. I put some sugar water on a cotton ball and put him in a glass container with some holes and a few sticks to climb on. After reading the page I offered a small cap with sugar water. My little guy is moving a lot more but I haven’t seen him flutter his wings. I am keeping him overnight inside but the high tomorrow is only 51.

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    Leave a Reply to Jinni

    1. 51 degrees is alright, so long as your bee is well-warmed before releasing her. Bumble bees do fly at colder temperatures than other bees, and they can generate their own warmth a bit too.

      I would try warming your bee up well indoors tomorrow in a warm room. Near a heater is fine, but not for too long or too close, and only if carefully monitored, since artificial heat can be very drying.

      It looks like the warmest parts of your days are between 1pm and 7pm, so what I would do is to begin warming your bee up around noon, and also offer sugar water in the later morning too (be careful not to offer too much, in case your bee is a bit clumsy).

      I would take her outdoors in her container close to 1pm, and if there's any direct sunlight, place her so the rays fall on her. Hopefully she'll be looking more active by that point, with both artificial warmth and sugar water, and be buzzing a bit.

      It may still take her some time before she flies off, but this way, she should have an ideal start to the day, and the warmest hours of the day before her to do what she needs to do.

      At this time of year, she's likely to be a young bumble bee queen searching for a place to hibernate in the ground. So you needn't worry about returning her to the same spot you found her.

      I hope she flies off happily tomorrow!

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      Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

  296. Hi. It's late October and I found a rather cold, hungry but very large bumble on the floor whilst walking with my children. We have brought him home, given some sugar water but it was nearly 5pm so we have kept him in a box overnight. He was making some attempts to move last night and walk around the box. But still very slow. Shall I take him back to the park today and just leave him in the sunshine!?? If we have any!

    Thank you x

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    Leave a Reply to Samantha

    1. I apologize for not replying sooner, I'm on west coast US time. Hopefully you took your bee to the park earlier today, as that's what I would have suggested. They seem very slow when they're cold, but all they usually need is a little warmth (and energy from nectar or sugar water) to get them going again. Sunshine is the best, but otherwise it's a good idea to warm them up artificially first, and then release them close to the warmest part of the day.

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      Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

  297. Hi, I rescued a bumble bee early this morning from a bucket of dirty cold water found out on the farm. It was completely drench so I took it indoors cut a water bottle in half and put some kitchen roll inside to help absorb the water off it. A few hours on and it’s really brightened up. I have given it some sugary warm water which it loved and now it seems bright. Shall I release it ? Or keep it in the warm until tomorrow? Many thanks

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Tiffany

    1. I apologize for not replying sooner. I think either way would be fine... my inclination would be to release her if it was not too late in the day where you are, so basically if there was still some daylight left.

      If you have ended up keeping her overnight, don't be surprised if she seems sluggish in the morning, that's quite natural since they slow down when they're colder in the night, and then take some time the following morning to warm up ready for flight.

      When keeping them overnight, it's important to mimic outdoor temperatures as much as possible (without freezing them, that is!), so that they don't get all buzzed up with nowhere to go. It's also good to keep their natural circadian rhythms normal (with typical day/night cycles).

      If you have kept her overnight, simply warm her well and offer more sugar water in the morning, and let her choose when to leave. I've seen bees take several hours to get going before, but it totally depends on the bee and the weather conditions.

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      Leave a Reply to Elise Fog

  298. Hi there,

    Hope u can help me found a bubble bee two days ago on the floor in the patio outside. Tried giving her sugary mix I think she did drink some, hard to tell. As on the floor shifted her to a table and tried again giving the mix she is not interested and keeps moving away.

    Have placed her on a bush and she seems ok still moving but not interested in the mix have tried everything. Her wings are on top of each other and seems fine. Why is she still alive after 3 days, with out drinking ? it’s getting really cold outside now some sunny does appear and I think she like that goes very still and stays there.

    What should I do leave her in her environment she has survived three days so far.

    Hope u can give me some advice. Thanks 🙂

    Reply

    Leave a Reply to Alice

    1. I realize it's late where you are now, but do you have any sunlight during the days, and is she in a spot where she'll get some sun on the bush? Are there still any flowers around for bees, perhaps dandelions if nothing else? Dandelions are nice because they flower so much earlier and later than other flowers, and they're also readily accessible to a variety of bee species.

      Another idea is to try gently warming her with your breath, breathing a few inches away from her. Basically warming her up would be a way to help her get on her way. She's still alive, even without drinking anything, because she's not using much energy. Bees, when they're cold, enter a state of to